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Emily Richmond

Emily Richmond is the public editor for the National Education Writers Association. She was the education reporter for the Las Vegas Sun from 2002 to 2010, and in 2011 she was Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan. She blogs at www.educatedreporter.com. Follow her on Twitter at @EWAEmily.

Recent Stories

Can this rural high school ‘drop the drama’?

Mia Clough, an 11th-grader, shares ideas for a code of conduct during the Drop the Drama class at Pittsfield Middle High School. Photo: Jim Vaiknoras PITTSFIELD,…

More students are graduating but that’s not the whole story

Obama administration touts rising graduation rates, but gaps remain

NCLB’s legacy: As the ESSA era begins, have policymakers, educators learned from the past?

President Bush promotes his “No Child Left Behind” education agenda during a visit to Kirkpatrick Elementary School in Nashville, Tenn., Monday, Sept. 8, 2003. Photo: AP Photo/J.…

When students lead parent-teacher conferences

A trend to have students present their grades to their families and teachers could improve them

How the Department of Defense schools are teaching their version of Common Core math

“New math” taking hold for students on U.S. military installations

What happens when instead of suspensions, kids talk out their mistakes?

New Hampshire high school asks students to talk, listen and make amends

From left: Meghan Meza, Meghan Jones, and Summer Gilliard, return to the school after lowering the flags at Quantico Middle/High School on March 13, 2015 in Quantico, VA.

Congress wants states and schools to track military-connected students

There is strong bipartisan support both in Congress and among advocacy groups that have argued that tracking kids from military families is long overdue

Jacob Galindo, 18, leads a final salute during a Marine Corps Junior ROTC class at Quantico Middle/High School. In a typical year, about 10 percent of the Department of Defense Education Activity's seniors report their plans to enlist in the military after graduation.

Schools on U.S. military installations raising standards, tracking students beyond high school

System seeks to ease transitions, improve results for students who move often

Learning more outside of the classroom than in

A new take on career education in high school may boost student motivation and performance

Schools on U.S. military installations are adopting Common Core — but don’t call it that

Each year 40 percent of children living on U.S. military installations change schools. Will Common Core ease their transition?

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