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Higher Education Editor

Jon Marcus

Jon Marcus, higher-education editor, has written about higher education for the Washington Post, USA Today, Time, the Boston Globe, Washington Monthly, is North America higher-education correspondent for the Times (U.K.) Higher Education magazine, and contributed to the book Reinventing Higher Education. His Hechinger coverage has won national awards from the Education Writers Association and he was a finalist for an award for beat reporting from the New York chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The former editor of Boston magazine, Marcus holds a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and a bachelor’s degree from Bates College. A journalism instructor at Boston College, he says he ends up learning from his students far more than he teaches them.

Recent Stories

Microsoft employees in Redmond, Washington. With a huge shortage of college graduates in data and computer science, tech companies are taking matters into their own hands and providing education directly to prospective tech workers.

Impatient with universities’ slow pace of change, employers go around them

Tech companies are sidestepping the middleman and creating their own courses

In an era of inequity, more and more college financial aid is going to the rich

Poor students still get money, but higher-income classmates get a growing share

Katherine Kerwin, legislative affairs chair of the University of Wisconsin student government, leads efforts against letting public university students in Wisconsin opt out of paying fees to clubs and causes with which they disagree. “We can’t eliminate things because we’re so close-minded that we don’t want to pay for an organization that we don’t believe in,” she says.

Should college students’ money be paying for controversial speakers and programs?

Debate comes as universities shift more and more costs to students, including the bill for hot button speakers and polarizing clubs

New research questions the value of certificates pushed by colleges, policymakers

Studies suggest these popular credentials often don’t improve job prospects or pay

The threat of Big Brother undermines a push to gather data about college student performance

Opponents of collecting more data now cite privacy fears, especially for Dreamers

The looming decline of the public research university

Cuts in research funding have left midwestern state schools—and the economies they support—struggling to survive

A student at Guttman Community College in New York City reads before the start of a class. Momentum is building to give associate degrees to students who have left community colleges but earned enough credits to get one.

States connect students with degrees they don’t know they’ve earned

To help catch up to lagging education targets, states reach out to non-grads

Like their students, colleges are vastly increasing the amount they borrow

Hoping to boost enrollments with new features, institutions take on billions in debt

When Dustin Gordon arrived at the University of Iowa, he found himself taking lecture classes with more people in them than his entire hometown of Sharpsburg, Iowa, population 89.

The high school grads least likely in America to go to college? Rural ones

Fewer than one in five rural adults aged 25 and older have college degrees, federal data show

How one college’s death and rebirth offers lessons for the rest

Antioch College has become a textbook case for other troubled schools to study