Matt Krupnick

Matt Krupnick is a freelance reporter and editor who contributes regularly to The New York Times and the Hechinger Report. He was a reporter with the Center for Public Integrity's State Integrity Investigation and is a member of Investigative Reporters and Editors and the Education Writers Association. He reported from Mexico while living in Oaxaca. Matt now lives in Brooklyn, N.Y., with his wife, cat and dog.

Recent Stories

A girl at recess runs at the Heart Butte School on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in northern Montana. Overshadowed by attention to the challenges faced by nonwhite high school graduates in cities, low-income black, Hispanic and native American students in rural areas are equally unlikely to go on to college.

Economics, culture and distance conspire to keep rural nonwhites from higher educations

Eclipsed by urban counterparts, rural nonwhites go to college at equally low rates

When Dustin Gordon arrived at the University of Iowa, he found himself taking lecture classes with more people in them than his entire hometown of Sharpsburg, Iowa, population 89.

The high school grads least likely in America to go to college? Rural ones

Fewer than one in five rural adults aged 25 and older have college degrees, federal data show

After decades of pushing bachelor’s degrees, U.S. needs more tradespeople

California budgets millions to rebrand long-disparaged vocational education

With number of student-parents up, availability of campus child care is down

The disparity could further widen the degree divide by race and income, experts say

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Trump budget doesn’t cover Pell Grants to be used for college summer courses

Idea, which has bipartisan support, would help speed low-income students to degrees

How scholarship websites sell students’ information to colleges and publishers

The tradeoff, companies say? Those students could win money to pay for college

How the immigration controversy could drive up the cost of college

Losing international students would cost U.S. universities billions in revenue

Universities cut services for a big group of their students: those over 25

Though more adults need higher educations, their enrollment has begun to fall

Cal students at UC Berkeley on Friday, April 10, 2015.

Number of international students at U.S. universities hits new high amid Trump worries

Survey, history suggest that students who feel less welcome here may choose to study elsewhere

U.S. quietly works to expand apprenticeships to fill white-collar jobs

With other countries’ systems as a model, apprenticeships have started to expand