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Contributing Editor

Sarah Carr

Sarah Carr is a contributing editor who also oversees the Teacher Project at Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. She has reported on battles over school vouchers, efforts to educate China’s massive population of migrant children, and the explosion of charter schools in New Orleans. Sarah is the author of Hope Against Hope, a nonfiction account of New Orleans schools post Hurricane-Katrina, which she reported as a Spencer Education Journalism fellow. Sarah has contributed to the Atlantic magazine, Slate, New Orleans public radio and numerous other media outlets, winning several national awards. She is a graduate of Williams College and Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. Sarah attended the Nauset Regional School District in Massachusetts, and got her start in journalism interning at the Cape Cod Times newspaper. A local high school kicked her out for trying to cover a student protest rally her first day as an intern, and Sarah is grateful to the many schools since then that have let her stay.

Recent Stories

Eighteen-year-old Wellington Coleman studies at Southern University of New Orleans through a special program, and hopes someday to become a software engineer.

New policies close off opportunities to college applicants in need of extra help

Where some once got a chance, many now diverted to the lowest-funded schools

A new way to evaluate teachers: Let them set their own standards

Last spring, as the school year was coming to a close, most of Michelle Breitenfeldt’s kindergarteners were not reading at grade level. But that did not stop the Wisconsin teacher…

Erin Lockley, 12th grade student at Cohen High School. (Photo: © William Widmer 2014)

The painful backlash against ‘no-excuses’ school discipline

NEW ORLEANS — From the moment Summer Duskin arrived at Carver Collegiate Academy in New Orleans last fall, she struggled to keep track of all the rules. There were rules…

Common Core math standards add up to big money for education companies

The politically controversial standards known as the Common Core have been in the headlines for months, in Louisiana and across the country. But for most teachers and educators the standards…

Elizabeth Marcell, executive director of intervention services at New Orleans' ReNEW Schools, works with a student in the charter network's therapeutic program. (Photo: Sarah Carr)

In New Orleans, a case study in how school, health care decentralization affect neediest children

NEW ORLEANS —One New Orleans 15-year-old with explosive disorder felt abandoned after the only therapist she trusted left town. A 14-year-old diagnosed with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, who became suicidal…

What will New Orleans’ move to an all-charter school district mean for the city’s schoolchildren?

This fall, New Orleans’ state-run Recovery School District will become the nation’s first big-city school system comprised entirely of charter schools. (A few non-charter schools will continue to operate outside…

In their own words

As part of a collaboration with Bard’s Early College program in New Orleans, The Hechinger Report has been asking teenagers to share their opinions on everything from discipline in…

At the Kids of Excellence child care center in New Orleans the children learn largely through play. (Photo: Sarah Carr)

Accountability comes to the nursery

Across the country, states are starting to rate early childhood programs. But Louisiana is taking that movement a step further, requiring all publicly funded programs to “test” their youngest learners,…

As study abroad becomes more crucial, few low-income students go

TOKYO — When Ricardo Parras flew across the Pacific to study in Japan, the turbulence he encountered was of the emotional variety. Having grown up in predominantly Hispanic Los Banos,…

Kameisha Smith, now a college student, was paddled three times between the ages of 10 and 14 in Holmes County public schools. (Photo: Jackie Mader)

Why are black students being paddled more in the public schools?

LEXINGTON, MISS. — Students in this central Mississippi town quickly learn that even minor transgressions can bring down the weight of the paddle. Seventh grader Steven Burns recounts getting smacked…

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