Photo of Tara García Mathewson

Staff writer

Tara García Mathewson

Tara García Mathewson is a staff writer. She launched her journalism career with two award-winning pieces co-produced during a three-month stint at the Kitsap Sun in Bremerton, WA. After graduating with honors from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, she joined the staff of the Daily Herald, Illinois’ third largest newspaper, where she covered city government and education in Chicago’s suburbs. There she was on a team that earned a Chicago Headline Club Lisagor Award for a series tied to the 40th anniversary of Title IX. García Mathewson left the daily grind of newspapers to spread her wings as an independent journalist, covering national education issues, immigration policy, Chicago’s Latino business community and more. She received the Marguerite Casey Foundation’s Equal Voice Journalism Fellowship in 2014 and the Education Writers Association Reporting Fellowship in 2017. García Mathewson lives in Boston. She grew up in rural Western New York, where she and her sister once waited for the bus for a very long time in more than a foot of snow because it didn’t occur to her family that school might be canceled.

Recent Stories

A student takes a quiz at a high school in Ossining, N.Y.

States will soon be free to transform standardized testing, but most won’t

Even states that only grudgingly rely on multiple-choice tests may sit out an “innovative assessment” pilot

A teacher helps a student who is otherwise working independently on his laptop.

The path to personalized learning is not straight

In the shift to personalized learning, schools and districts often chart distinctly different ways

Tulsa Public Schools uses visualizations to make it easy for teachers to look at student data and put their insights to use in the classroom.

Psst! When teachers get useful, timely data, they use it

Easy-to-read data dashboards can get teachers the student information they need to improve instruction

Making ‘Big Data’ useful rather than scary for teachers

How one district created a system to make data “a flashlight, not a hammer”

When the future of learning includes teacher training, too

Some schools are extending innovation to the people at the front of the classroom – and students benefit

As students spend more time on digital devices in school, data security becomes increasingly important.

Who is keeping student data safe in the era of digital learning?

Some districts go above and beyond compliance to foster trust among parents

Students from City As School high school in New York City think like engineers as they construct a water filtration system.

The next generation of science education means more doing

New standards push class activities that get kids thinking and acting like scientists

Carla Savinon, now a sophomore, works on a painting in her visual arts class last spring at Boston’s Margarita Muñiz Academy, where arts are a core component of the curriculum.

With no silver bullet, innovation abounds at this bilingual high school

The school also features expeditionary learning, mastery-based grading, technology, the arts and community-building

Students participate in morning workshops in advance of national May 1 “Day Without Immigrants” rallies, learning also about the labor rights history of May Day rallies worldwide.

A Spanish-English high school proves learning in two languages can boost graduation rates

Educators believe teaching in two languages can be key to student success

Experiments that send parents useful information by text have been found to increase student attendance and reduce course failures dramatically.

Sending parents useful information about attendance, course progress has big effects, social scientists find

Parents could be a greater resource in efforts to increase student achievement

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