Blended Learning

More classrooms have high-tech devices. More schools have speedy Internet connections. And more teachers are mixing technology into their lessons. Can blended learning improve academic outcomes? Will it help disadvantaged students? The Hechinger Report explores the way new technology is changing what we teach and learn. See all our Special Reports

iZone mentor Diedre Downing, a math teacher at NYC iSchool in Manhattan, walks Blended Learning Institute participant Juliana Matherson through Google' Autocrat application on July 18, 2014 in Manhattan. Autocrat lets teachers give custom feedback to students after an online assignment. The New York City Department of Education's Blended Learning Institute is a two-year training program taught by current classroom teachers on how to use the part digital, part traditional classroom style. (Photo: Alexandria Neason)

Ready or not, here it comes: Remaking teacher training with an innovative twist

Until recently, the options for first-rate training for teachers were fairly limited. Teachers filed into seats in whatever college happened to be closest to home, regardless of the quality of…

Nolan Young, 3, front, looks at a smart phone while his brother Jameson, right, 4, looks at a smart tablet at their home, in Boston.

Wondering at what age you can safely let a child play with a tablet? Well, keep wondering

What effect does exposure to digital screens have on children’s health?

Ninth grade students organize nuts and bolts the day after their end-of-the-year showcase in which they flew their school-made drones for parents and visitors.

Are we blaming high school when college needs a reality check?

Ninth grade students at High Tech High organize nuts and bolts the day after their end-of-the-year showcase in which they flew their school-made drones for parents and visitors.…

Kelsey Hunt, left, and Harley Graham, right, students from Fairmont High School in Fairmont, North Carolina, pose with Joel Shapiro's 'Untitled' as part of a virtual exhibit they created during a

Technology lets students ‘flip’ the field trip

North Carolina museum’s “flipped field trip” lets high school students share art creation virtually

iZone mentor Diedre Downing, a math teacher at NYC iSchool in Manhattan, walks Blended Learning Institute participant Juliana Matherson through Google' Autocrat application on July 18, 2014 in Manhattan. Autocrat lets teachers give custom feedback to students after an online assignment. The New York City Department of Education's Blended Learning Institute is a two-year training program taught by current classroom teachers on how to use the part digital, part traditional classroom style. (Photo: Alexandria Neason)

Should educational materials be set free for all to use? Some say, yes.

  Photo: Alexandria Neason A letter signed by more than 100 educators, scientists, lawyers and techies arrived last week on the digital…

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Ninth grade students organize nuts and bolts the day after their end-of-the-year showcase in which they flew their school-made drones for parents and visitors.

Hands-on high school prepares students for the real world and jobs, but what about college?

With a new spotlight on High Tech High, questions arise about its model

Bass-Hoover Elementary School teacher Jessica DeMarco, standing left, assists some of her students in readying their tablets for a reading assignment in Stephens City, Va., on Tuesday, March 10, 2015.

Tablets and other tech offer ways to track teacher performance beyond just standardized tests

Bass-Hoover Elementary School teacher Jessica DeMarco, standing left, assists some of her students in readying their tablets for a reading assignment in Stephens City, Va., on Tuesday, March…

Horgan Elementary School first-grader Evelina Lucas, right, helps her Chromebook buddy, kindergartener Emily Zhang, in a graphing exercise.

Cut through the clutter: One start-up offers a method for rating education technology

Horgan Elementary School first-grader Evelina Lucas, right, helps her Chromebook buddy, kindergartener Emily Zhang, in a graphing exercise. Photo: Gretchen Ertl A start-up company built around…

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