Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students. See all our Special Reports

STUDENT VOICE: He started in community college and now he’s a Rhodes Scholar

'We should never mistake our being first for being the first who were worthy'

Rutgers Newark sophomore Stacy Tyndall, 19, laughs at an

How one university is luring coveted honors students with social justice

To revitalize its home city, Rutgers University-Newark has started an honors program that looks beyond test scores to students' commitment to social change

New housing is popping up near Vaux high school, one piece of a $500 million redevelopment project in blighted North Philadelphia.

Can a school save a neighborhood?

Philadelphia’s housing authority bought a high school. It hopes the institution can help reverse the fortunes of one of the city’s poorest areas.

Oil references are everywhere at Williston State College, at the heart of North Dakota’s Bakken oilfield.

For rural colleges, good vocational teachers are hard to find

A national shortage hits remote colleges often responsible for keeping their towns afloat

Dominic, 3 and Zaire, 2, play while their moms take part in a conversation about bullying at a Family Scholar House Café Night.

These formerly homeless single moms beat the odds and are now college grads

They're hoping to give their children a better chance, too

Even if they want to go to college, millions of adults live in higher education “deserts”

At least 25 miles from the nearest campus, they also don’t have internet speeds to study online

Allison Dinsmore and her boyfriend, Grant Montgomery, students at California’s Newark Memorial High School. Montgomery says college recruiters seldom come to their school.

Silicon Valley aims its tech at helping low-income kids get beyond high school

New platform gives some students a message they rarely hear: They can go to college

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The new convocation center at Xavier University is seen in New Orleans, Monday, Sept. 2, 2013. Student Landan Moore says Xavier is his dream school.

A college scholarship meant to help low-income, black students now serves mostly white, middle-class kids

Not TOPS anymore? Louisiana may cut scholarship program that used to be a national model

High schools push few students with disabilities to consider college

Most students with disabilities can make it to and through college, but are hindered by low expectations.

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