Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students. See all our Special Reports

Similar students, different results: where black college students do best, and worst

And putting HBCUs in context reveals better graduation rates

A racially charged assault spurs schools to rally behind Portland’s large refugee community

‘Welcoming refugees is not a political issue. It’s about people.’

OPINION: Is a two-year college sometimes the best path to a four-year degree?

Looking back, student says going to community college first would have been the smart choice

OPINION: Six tips for going to college and working full-time, from a student struggling to do both

“I just want to quit my job so I can focus on my education. But how can I?”

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Not all towns are created equal, digitally

How a Colorado school district struggles to give its students a technology boost

Obama says failing to help everyone will drag down the economy. Here’s how research shows that’s true

Failing to get Hispanics to and through college will lower incomes for all, according to growing body of knowledge

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