Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students. See all our Special Reports

OPINION: Did applying for financial aid just get harder?

How simplifying FAFSA can help close the gap in college enrollment

Top universities could take thousands more low-income students, study says

Most elite schools have posted budget surpluses they could use to subsidize financial aid

With number of student-parents up, availability of campus child care is down

The disparity could further widen the degree divide by race and income, experts say

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Idaho gives education money directly to teenagers to manage themselves

Every seventh grader gets $4,125 to spend on early college credits, other extras

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