Higher education access

Olympic hopeful figure skater Max Aaron on the practice rink in Colorado Springs. Aaron, who is 25, earned a degree in finance in December. He worked as a barback and a waiter on the weekends to help pay the tuition and took his classes early in the morning and late at night to accommodate his training schedule.

Even with help, Olympic athletes struggle to balance their sports with college

Their stories illustrate how, for older students, getting a degree is like skating uphill

Microsoft employees in Redmond, Washington. With a huge shortage of college graduates in data and computer science, tech companies are taking matters into their own hands and providing education directly to prospective tech workers.

Impatient with universities’ slow pace of change, employers go around them

Tech companies are sidestepping the middleman and creating their own courses

Peter O'Halloran checks supplies at his job. O'Halloran works full-time at a nonprofit in Philadelphia.

The ‘forgotten’ part of special education that could lead to better outcomes for students

Many former special education students struggle to find good-paying jobs, and high schools are partly to blame

“I had moments last semester when I didn’t want to study anymore. I thought: I’ll just work my job and get paid, and that’s it,” said Zuleima Dominguez, a student at Hunter College.

Undocumented high schoolers work long hours, putting college further out of reach

Working to support themselves and their families through the high school years hits undocumented teens disproportionally hard. Three young people describe their paths to higher education.

Latino students at Loyola Marymount University in California have an enviable 80 percent graduation rate, compared with 77 percent for white students.

New research shows Latinos closing the racial gap on college degrees, but still lagging far behind whites

Big differences in graduation rates persist, depending on the institution

Anthony Rodriguez and Juneba Sulaiman both passed a college-level statistics class last summer after a placement exam indicated they weren’t ready for college-level math.

The community college “segregation machine”

Too many black and Latino students get stuck in remedial classes, thwarting college dreams

KIPP players on the sidelines at their game against Sophie B. Wright game.

City that loved and lost high school football finally gets it back

After ripping up an entire school district, charter schools try to mend fences by reviving Friday night lights

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In an era of inequity, more and more college financial aid is going to the rich

Poor students still get money, but higher-income classmates get a growing share

Julie and Matthew high-five during a home-school lesson.

These students are finishing high school, but their degrees don’t help them go to college

For students with disabilities, completing high school does not always lead to greater opportunity.

Client Paul Chirico of Los Angeles works with tax preparer Erika Arbulante to see how the Affordable Care Act, ACA, will impact his tax returns at H&R Block on January 8, 2015 in Los Angeles, California.

Apprenticeships could provide a path to the middle class for millions of workers, new study says

The workforce programs could spread to more than 70 well-paid occupations

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