The Science of Learning

Scientific research on how to teach critical thinking contradicts education trends

An education researcher writes that scientists are united in their belief that content knowledge is crucial to effective critical thinking

education research

The dark side of education research: widespread bias

Johns Hopkins study finds that insider research shows 70 percent more benefits to students than independent research

Research scholars to air problems with using ‘grit’ at school

The author of the popular concept says it was never intended as a way to raise grades

Restorative justice is about more than just reducing suspensions

Psychologists are exploring how traditional disciplinary tactics fall short and why community-minded alternatives are worth exploring

Neuroscientists have found that curious students learn better because their brain activity changes in ways that help them retain new information. Now researchers are testing ways to encourage that curiosity — for example, by encouraging teachers to model inquisitive behavior.

Piqued: The case for curiosity

Scientists are discovering that curious learners from low-income households perform as well as affluent students

Some teachers are trading red grading pens like this one for video feedback. There’s evidence that video grading does more to motivate students than written edits — and it can also save teachers time.

Has video killed the red grading pen?

Teachers are experimenting with video feedback as a replacement for traditional written mark-ups

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Are science fairs unfair?

Long an educational rite of passage, the events are being revamped to make them more effective — and equitable — learning opportunities

Why talking — and listening — to your child could be key to brain development

A new neuroscience study finds that back-and-forth conversation is related to brain activity and verbal aptitude

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