The Science of Learning

Neuroscientists have found that curious students learn better because their brain activity changes in ways that help them retain new information. Now researchers are testing ways to encourage that curiosity — for example, by encouraging teachers to model inquisitive behavior.

Piqued: The case for curiosity

Scientists are discovering that curious learners from low-income households perform as well as affluent students

Some teachers are trading red grading pens like this one for video feedback. There’s evidence that video grading does more to motivate students than written edits — and it can also save teachers time.

Has video killed the red grading pen?

Teachers are experimenting with video feedback as a replacement for traditional written mark-ups

Are science fairs unfair?

Long an educational rite of passage, the events are being revamped to make them more effective — and equitable — learning opportunities

Why talking — and listening — to your child could be key to brain development

A new neuroscience study finds that back-and-forth conversation is related to brain activity and verbal aptitude

Helping teens find their purpose

A new movement in schools makes room for students to explore life’s big questions

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How to study smarter

Don’t just highlight and reread to prep for an exam; research proves there are far better ways to get ready

When body meets mind in learning

Whether it’s reading, math or science, we absorb ideas better with some body language

How legalizing marijuana could hurt student achievement

As we loosen cannabis laws, we should weigh the impact on learning

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