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  • About
    Hechinger exeecutive editor Sarah Garland (left) and editor/director Liz Willen. (Photo by Jackie Mader)

    Hechinger executive editor Sarah Garland (left) and editor/director Liz Willen. (Photo by Jackie Mader)

    OUR MISSION:

    We cover inequality and innovation in education with in-depth journalism that uses research, data and stories from classrooms and campuses to show the public how education can be improved and why it matters.

    WHY WE EXIST:

    Education is one of the most important issues of our time. Yet fewer reporters than ever cover national education issues. At the same time, politicians, education advocates and educators are sounding the alarm about unequal outcomes and stagnant performance in schools, along with issues of cost, quality and equity in higher education, and they’re unleashing a flood of ideas for how to make improvements. More than ever, the public needs deep and incisive journalism that uncovers the real problems facing our education system and examines the evidence supporting proposed solutions.

    The Hechinger Report is an independent, nonprofit newsroom that fills this gap.

    Our goal is not only to replace or supplement what’s been lost; it’s to push education reporting to new levels of quality, clarity, depth and breadth, to explain why education policy matters and how it’s affecting young people.

    Our stories take readers into classrooms and onto campuses to show how students and teachers are affected by decisions made in city halls, state legislatures and Washington, D.C. We dig into data, statistics and research to discover inequities and test claims about potential fixes. And we go where others don’t – to struggling schools in the Mississippi Delta, to booming university cities in China, to isolated villages in the Bering Sea, to community colleges in Appalachia, to inner-city schools in Detroit – to find stories that will have an impact on the future of American schooling.

    HOW WE WORK:

    You’ll find many of these stories in the pages of the nation’s biggest newspapers, magazines and websites and on the air of its most prominent broadcasters. That’s because we provide our work to them for free, to increase awareness about the important stories our journalists are reporting.

    You can also find all of our stories at this site, a deep repository of some of the best journalism about education.

    OUR FUNDING:

    The Hechinger Report is an independent nonprofit, nonpartisan organization based at Teachers CollegeColumbia University. We rely on support from foundations and individual donors to carry out our work.

    Content published in The Hechinger Report 
    — or content produced and disseminated by any of its collaborators with funding from the Hechinger Institute — is editorially independent of its funders, and does not necessarily reflect the views of Teachers College, its trustees, administration or faculty.

    OUR VALUES:

    Independent: Our journalists ask tough questions and report on facts that contradict the status quo and threaten powerful interests.

    In-depth: We are experts who study research and data before sending our journalists into classrooms and onto campuses to see ideas being carried out in practice.

    High quality: Our stories are deeply researched and reported, carefully written and rigorously edited.

    Solution oriented: Our mission isn’t only to expose problems. We want to find out what’s being done to fix them and whether those solutions are working and can be replicated.

    Timely: The landscape of American education is changing quickly. We are on top of new developments and strive to be the first to explain the latest trends.

    Accessible: The purpose of our journalism is to better inform the public about how well schools are serving students. That’s why we cut out the jargon and tell it like it is, so readers understand.