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Higher Education Editor

Jon Marcus

Jon Marcus, higher-education editor, has written about higher education for the Washington Post, USA Today, Time, the Boston Globe, Washington Monthly, is North America higher-education correspondent for the Times (U.K.) Higher Education magazine, and contributed to the book Reinventing Higher Education. His Hechinger coverage has won national awards from the Education Writers Association and he was a finalist for an award for beat reporting from the New York chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The former editor of Boston magazine, Marcus holds a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and a bachelor’s degree from Bates College. A journalism instructor at Boston College, he says he ends up learning from his students far more than he teaches them.

Recent Stories

North Carolina's attorney general shut down the Charlotte School of Law before it was scheduled to open this past fall.

As feds pull back, states step in to regulate for-profit colleges and universities

Securities filings show an industry increasingly vexed about state oversight, enforcement

race and college admission

Facts about race and college admission

Political winds may shift, but racial factors in college success statistics don’t

The line between Texas and Arkansas in front of the bi-state federal building, which straddles both. Texas A&M University at Texarkana has one of the lowest retention rates of public higher-education institutions; 55 percent who started in 2012 were gone by 2016.

More high school grads than ever are going to college, but 1 in 5 will quit

New data show little progress in retaining students, despite efforts to plug the leak

Sweet Briar College in Virginia. The liberal arts college was saved from closing only by the intervention of alumni and others.

With enrollment sliding, liberal arts colleges struggle to make a case for themselves

To thwart the skepticism of prospective students, some map job options, offer guarantees

University of Washington freshman Jenica Tran says it’s mostly up to students to make sure they graduate on time. “You can get the help if you go out to seek it, but you have to do it on your own,” she says.

Embattled colleges focus on an obvious fix: helping students graduate on time

While most students expect to earn degrees in four years, fewer than half actually do

Garret Morgan is training as an ironworker near Seattle, and already has a job that pays him $50,000 a year.

High-paying jobs go begging while high school grads line up for bachelor’s degrees

Huge shortages loom in the skilled trades, which require less — and cheaper — training

The University of La Verne near Los Angeles. The university makes it easier than most private colleges for students to transfer from other institutions.

Transfer students start getting more of the credits they’ve already earned

Pushed by enrollment slump and political pressure, colleges lower barriers to transfer

Allison Dinsmore and her boyfriend, Grant Montgomery, students at California’s Newark Memorial High School. Montgomery says college recruiters seldom come to their school.

Silicon Valley aims its tech at helping low-income kids get beyond high school

New platform gives some students a message they rarely hear: They can go to college

Students, employees scour college finances for waste, proof of unfair pay

As public confidence declines, university budgets and investments face growing scrutiny

David Andy, who is enrolled in a program in advanced manufacturing at Metro State University in Denver designed in collaboration with employers.

Worker shortage spurs uncharacteristic partnerships connecting colleges, business

One state tries to close the odd divide between what students learn and employers need