Why a New Jersey school district decided giving laptops to students is a terrible ideaNEWS

Why a New Jersey school district decided giving laptops to students is a terrible idea

This year alone, schools are projected to spend almost $10 billion on education technology, a $240-million increase from 2013.

COLUMNISTS

Want teens to pay attention? Tell them they’re being manipulated

Photo: Martin Rickett/PA via AP Images
By Annie Murphy Paul

Many a parent and teacher has despaired over how easily young people’s attention is diverted, especially when they’re online. Stay focused! we urge them. Don’t let yourself get distracted! Our admonitions have little sway against the powerful temptations of the Internet. But there may be a better way to help teenagers resist the web’s lures: […]

NEWS

Can special education students keep up with the Common Core?

Christina Liberatore, an inclusion teacher at East Moriches Elementary School, helps her fourth-grade students complete a group assignment. (Photo: Amanda M. Fairbanks)
By Amanda M. Fairbanks

East Moriches, New York — On a morning in late May, the pace was slow and deliberate as seven students formed a semicircle around their teacher to work on a lesson about finding the main idea in a story. “I have a surprise for you on my phone,” said Nicole Papa, before starting an audio […]

NEWS

Reports of MOOCs’ demise have been greatly exaggerated

By Craig Weidemann

Last year’s exuberance about the impact of massive open online courses has fizzled. MOOCs have been widely eulogized as “overpromised,” “off course,” and just plain “enough already!” This much ballyhooed and belittled phenomenon is clearly neither the cure for all that ails higher education, nor the end of colleges and universities as we know them. […]

COLUMNISTS

A look at Mississippi’s request to end cheating, with tests included

By Andre Perry

Last week, the Mississippi Department of Education requested $1 million from the state legislature to combat cheating on statewide examinations. The request comes on the heels of alleged cheating systems The Clarion-Ledger wrote about at Clarksdale’s Heidelberg Elementary School earlier this year. Thereafter the state’s education department spent $300,000 to hire Utah-based consultant Caveon Test […]

NEWS

Report: 31 million Americans have college credits, but no degree

By Jon Marcus

At a time when policymakers are struggling to increase the proportion of Americans with college and university degrees, more than 31 million people have already accumulated credits but quit without graduating, a new report shows. And while a third of those left after as little as a single term, about 21 million spent more than […]

BLOGS

US educators lead the world in overestimating student poverty, which may affect educational mobility

By Jill Barshay

Do educators’ perceptions of how disadvantaged their students are matter? Put another way, when teachers think their students are underprivileged, do they have lower expectations for them, and do their students achieve less at school? In a July 22, 2014, article “Poverty and the perception of poverty – how both matter for schooling outcomes,” Andreas […]

PARTNERS

Feds back English learner lawsuit against state

By John Fensterwald

The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California has found an ally in the U.S. Department of Justice for its lawsuit charging that the state abdicated its obligation to ensure all students classified as English learners get extra instructional services to become fluent in English. The lawsuit, filed in April 2013, is set for a one-day trial next week in Los Angeles County Superior Court.

OPINION

Getting low income students to college takes more than just academics

Jason Bernal is CEO of the Yes Prep, charter school network with 13 schools in Houston, Texas.
By Jason Bernal

At a time when a college diploma is more important than ever to compete in the global economy, only 10% of students from low-income communities across the country who enroll in college are earning a degree. Pair that with the fact that the majority of African American and Latino students graduating high school don’t meet […]

COLUMNISTS

Ed tech promoters need to understand how most of us learn

Bill Gates (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
By Annie Murphy Paul

When Bill Gates was still a teenager, he would sneak out of his family’s house before dawn and ride his bike to a building on the campus of the University of Washington. He had discovered that the university’s huge supercomputers were idle between the hours of three and six in the morning, allowing the budding […]

PARTNERS

Rocketship throttles back multistate expansion

By Arianna Prothero

Rocketship, the charter management organization that has been grabbing headlines for its explosive national growth strategy, has been reevaluating those goals recently.

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