Early Education

Providing children with the experiences they need to succeed in school before starting kindergarten is critical. But what should those experiences be? Who should pay for them? As parents, school leaders and policymakers struggle to answer these and other questions, we cover what’s working, and what’s not, in early education. See all our Special Reports

Students engage in creative activities on the playground at a San Antonio public preschool.

Measuring success at San Antonio’s public preschool program

While Pre-K 4 SA’s parents and alumni sing its praises, critics say the program should have broader focus

Two educators discuss how and when race, or racism, showed up in their classrooms at the Border Crossers training.

How social studies can help young kids make sense of the world

Civic engagement matters today more than ever, yet social studies in the early grades are sidelined. To make up for this absence, some educators seek outside training on how to handle sensitive issues in the classroom

Malachi Ballinger, 6, laughs at how far he has made his “pinball” travel during a science lesson in his kindergarten classroom in Redmond, Oregon.

Will new standards improve elementary science education?

Science has rarely been considered a priority in elementary school, but that may be changing.

Rosy Taveras, a kindergarten teacher at P.S. 218 in the Bronx, models fluent and expressive reading.

How to help struggling young readers

Children who can’t read well by third grade are more likely to become drop-outs. Research-based coaching could make a critical difference.

Small-group math work at Prairie Oak Elementary in Berwyn North School District 98 where, two years ago, just 14 percent of third-graders were able to do grade-level math.

How to boost math skills in the early grades

Early math skills, though critical to academic success, get far less attention than literacy in high-poverty classrooms. One Illinois school district is working to change that.

Mississippi improves in child well-being rankings, but still has room to improve

Decrease in child poverty, parental unemployment bumps Mississippi up slightly in national rankings

Teachers continue their strike at the state capitol on April 9, 2018 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Thousands of teachers and supporters continue to rally at the state Capitol as Oklahoma becomes the latest state to be plagued by teacher strife. Teachers are walking off the job after a $6,100 pay raise was rushed through the Legislature and signed into law by Gov. Mary Fallin.

If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you don’t work over the weekend, thank a union

The Janus Supreme Court ruling is bad news for all of us

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Sian Beilock

How to help children overcome math anxiety

The president of Barnard talks about the math games she plays with her daughter

Students in a Granite School District preschool classroom learn about the letter T.

OPINION: When preschool teachers can’t afford care for their own children

Salaries of $12 an hour, poor working conditions undermine the quality of early education

Kanetha Brown goes over the days of the week with her charges at her home-based child care program in Wichita, Kan. Brown has training as an educator, but knows of other home-based care options where kids learn little during the day. Most states only require a high school diploma to run a home-based child care facility.

Five things you should know about the people watching your children

Caring for young children in the U.S. continues to be devalued as unskilled ‘women’s work’

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