Immigration Crisis

The heated national debate about immigration is having a profound impact on many students and their teachers. Students who are fearful family members might be deported, traumatized by experiences back home and on their journey here, and worried about their own futures, are having trouble coping. In this series, The Hechinger Report examines how teachers and administrators are doing their best to help them focus on their school work and navigate a difficult political time.

How teachers are helping students affected by deportations

Immigration lawyers and education experts offer advice to teachers balancing legal requirements and moral obligations

High schoolers in a social studies class at Patchogue-Medford work on a lesson about the history of nationalism.

After a hate crime, a town welcomes immigrants into its schools

Patchogue, Long Island, site of a brutal anti-immigrant murder in 2008, has revamped its school programs to better assist young people fleeing violence in Central America

The Thompson family, (from left) Clive, CJ, Christine, Oneita and Timothy, stand in the sanctuary of the First United Methodist Church of Germantown, where the parents and their two youngest children have been living since August.

Going to school when your family is in hiding from ICE

ICE allowed a Jamaican family to stay in the country for years, then suddenly ordered them deported last summer. Now, as the family seeks sanctuary in a church, the children are struggling to maintain their grades and dreams of college