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prison education programs

Propelling prisoners to bachelor’s degrees in California

As the First Step Act is set to release more federal prisoners and Congress considers offering additional inmates financial aid for college, California’s overhaul of prison education offers a blueprint for other states.

certificate programs

‘They just saw me as a dollar sign’: How some certificate schools profit from vulnerable students

When government turns a blind eye, for-profit colleges fail to fulfill promise of a fast path to a new career and leave students in debt

clock

Does lunch have to be 45 minutes? Rethinking school schedules to support innovation

Getting creative with class-period lengths and staffing plans can dramatically reduce class sizes and increase teacher collaboration time

OPINION: Online homework tools trade ‘busy work’ for feedback to help end inequities in schools

Technology that levels the playing field by keeping every student on track

developmental preschool

Preschool for children with disabilities works, but federal funding for it is plummeting

Special education programs for preschoolers with disabilities are required by law. But as the number of students needing services has doubled, funding per child has decreased 40% in two decades

The messy reality of personalized learning

In Rhode Island, questions persist about the effectiveness of individualized instruction via laptop

OPINION: When it comes to raising school achievement, is love in the mix?

Giving students and educators the positive support they need

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Students at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas. The school has made steady progress in increasing diversity on campus. Enrollment of underrepresented minorities has climbed from 12 percent in 2002 to roughly 27 percent this year.

Texas 10% policy didn’t expand number of high schools feeding students to top universities

Affirmative action workaround isn't working, researchers find

From prison to dean’s list: How Danielle Metz got an education after incarceration

Just 4 percent of formerly incarcerated people have a bachelor’s degree. Now, a movement to raise that number is gaining momentum as Congress reconsiders a ban on Pell grants for prisoners, and some states seek to prevent universities from barring felons

To smooth transitions from home to pre-K to kindergarten, states must invest in every aspect of early ed

West Virginia educators say working within a high-quality preschool program that emphasizes academic standards, teacher collaboration and family relationships makes it easy to burnish their strong reputation for thoughtfully executed transitions

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