Solutions

Aimee Chartier served four years in the U.S. Marine Corps as an intelligence analyst, and is now a sophomore at Brown University, studying political science.

At top colleges that train America’s elite, veterans are an almost invisible minority

Of 1 million GI Bill recipients now in college, the most elite schools enroll well under 1 percent

Sasha Redlener, a fourth-grade teacher at Mott Haven Academy Charter School, helps her students with an assignment. Classes at the school mix “body breaks” and other playtime with reading and math instruction and lessons in social and emotional skills.

‘A child is not a revolving door’

A South Bronx school started by a child welfare agency has gradually found answers for educating youth in foster care

Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Dickinson is among a growing number of colleges and universities that involve their faculty in watching for problems that could derail students — something not traditionally considered their role.

At a growing number of colleges, faculty get a new role: spotting troubled students

On most campuses, however, ensuring students succeed is still not considered part of the job

A high school student repairs a car in an automotive shop class. Jobs in automotive body repair are relatively safe from automation, and they don't require a college degree.

Ten jobs that are safe from robots

A college degree, problem-solving skills and the ability to adapt to technological change will help land jobs at low risk for automation

Keith Murphy, recovery counselor, and Lisa Laitman, director of the Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program, speaking with a resident of the Rutgers University Recovery House.

A new challenge for colleges: opioid-addicted students

Driven by deaths or state pressure, institutions are opening “recovery houses”

Veteran science teacher Craig Fischer tries to give his students hands-on learning opportunities as often as possible.

Teach like it’s summer school all year long

Hands-on, real-world assignments take more time but can be valuable for students

Marletha Muhammad helps her daughter, Khanila, spell her name with chalk at a June playgroup meeting in Rocky Mount, North Carolina The purpose of the meetings is to encourage healthy interactions between parents and their young children.

Playgroups offer rural families a head start on school

A North Carolina program shows parents the importance of play

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Students have access to hundreds of courses while they are in Illinois' juvenile justice facilities, but they tend to focus on math, language arts, social studies and science.

Online learning can open doors for kids in juvenile jails

But the quality of online coursework is one of many concerns for advocates

Roosevelt Montás, who spoke no English when he arrived in New York City from the Dominican Republic at age 12, leads Columbia University’s Freedom and Citizenship summer program for New York high school students.

Reading, writing and arguing: Can a summer of big questions push students to college?

High school students get jump-start studying great books, philosophers

Northern Cass student Katelyn Stavenes taking part in the Jaguar Academy pilot, a piece of the district’s plan to eliminate grade levels by the fall of 2020.

What’s school without grade levels?

One district’s drive to teach competencies means eliminating age-based classrooms

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