Photo of Jill Barshay

Staff Writer and Editor

Jill Barshay

Jill Barshay is a staff writer and editor who writes the weekly “Proof Points” column about education research and data. She taught algebra to ninth graders for the 2013-14 school year. In school, English was Jill’s worst subject; she now thanks all the teachers who covered her papers in red ink. Previously, Jill was the New York bureau chief for Marketplace, a national business show on public radio stations. She has also written for Congressional Quarterly, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and the Financial Times and appeared on CNN and ABC News. A graduate of Brown University, Jill holds master's degrees from the London School of Economics and Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. She was a 2016-17 Spencer Fellow in Education Journalism. In 2019 she received the American Educational Research Association's award for excellence in media reporting on education research.

Recent Stories

writing instruction

Scientific evidence on how to teach writing is slim

14 high-quality studies of writing instruction point to "exciting, social and noisy" classrooms

U.S. education achievement slides backwards

Substantial decrease in reading scores among the nation's eighth graders

black male students

Some evidence for the importance of teaching black culture to black students

A separate class for black boys led to improvements in dropout rates, study finds

Impact funds pour money into ed tech businesses

Will tracking outcomes such as student engagement and school climate be helpful?

Student loan default rates inch down as for-profit sector contracts

Rise in income-based repayment plans masks distress that default rates used to reveal

Harvard critic finds white jocks and rich kids get preferential treatment in admissions

Economist estimates that three-fourths of white students who are athletes, legacies, big donors or faculty children would have been rejected

mechanistic explanations

How you talk to your child might make them smarter

New research dissects the explanations that parents and teachers give young kids

racial segregation

An analysis of achievement gaps in every school in America shows that poverty is the biggest hurdle

A Stanford study finds that racial segregation matters because black and Hispanic students are concentrated in high poverty schools

Students walk on campus at UC Merced in Merced, Ca. Monday, April 13, 2015.

Economists find free community college can backfire

Simulations by researchers find that the most cost effective way to raise college education levels in America would be to increase taxpayer spending at public universities

Scientific research on how to teach critical thinking contradicts education trends

An education researcher writes that scientists are united in their belief that content knowledge is crucial to effective critical thinking

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