Photo of Meredith Kolodner

Staff Writer

Meredith Kolodner

Meredith Kolodner is a staff writer. She previously covered schools for the New York Daily News and was an editor at InsideSchools.org and for The Investigative Fund at the Nation Institute. She’s also covered housing, schools, and local government for the Press of Atlantic City and The Chief-Leader newspaper and her work has appeared in the New York Times and the American Prospect. Kolodner is a graduate of Brown University and Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and an active New York City public school parent. She is grateful to her 11th grade English teacher who persistently gave her Cs on essays until she finally stopped burying the lead.

Recent Stories

DEBT WITHOUT DEGREE: Gaps in financial aid, funding contribute to growing number of Georgians with college loans and no college degree

State funding to Georgia’s public college system has dropped while student costs have shot up

DEBT WITHOUT DEGREE: The human cost of college debt that becomes “purgatory”

In a vicious circle, debt and low-paying jobs make it tough to earn a way back to college

DEBT WITHOUT DEGREE: Students drown in debt despite a $524 million state surplus

“It's just sitting there,” as thousands of Georgia students drop out with loan debt

New study shows more degrees earned at colleges and universities that serve minorities

The official federal graduation rates for colleges and universities that serve large numbers of black, Latino and Asian students significantly underestimate how many of their students are earning degrees, according…

Trump’s budget axes campus-based childcare for low-income students

Parents enrolled in college would lose a childcare program aimed at helping them graduate under Trump budget

What good is new summer Pell money if students can’t use it?

Congress authorized year-round Pell grants, but the money’s unlikely to flow this summer

California’s new effort to fix remedial education

Three-quarters of students require remediation, and most don’t make it

Will high school segregation for refugees lead to better integration?

In Bowling Green, Kentucky, refugee and immigrant students can choose a separate high school

Six reasons you may not graduate on time

And what you can do about it

Similar students, different results: where black college students do best, and worst

And putting HBCUs in context reveals better graduation rates

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