Universities, Inc.

Universities run much like any other human institutions, something that seems as obvious as it has long been misunderstood. They need revenue, market themselves, and in general serve their self interest. We look at how American higher education operates in ways that many Americans may not know. See all our Special Reports

At least four colleges and universities in the Midwest alone have added certificate or associate degree programs in beer fermentation, brewing, brew management and wine and viticulture technology, among the 41,446 degree or certificate programs colleges and universities have added since 2012.

Panicked universities in search of students are adding thousands of new majors

Despite tight budgets and high risks, colleges hope niche degrees will spur demand

North Carolina's attorney general shut down the Charlotte School of Law before it was scheduled to open this past fall.

As feds pull back, states step in to regulate for-profit colleges and universities

Securities filings show an industry increasingly vexed about state oversight, enforcement

The line between Texas and Arkansas in front of the bi-state federal building, which straddles both. Texas A&M University at Texarkana has one of the lowest retention rates of public higher-education institutions; 55 percent who started in 2012 were gone by 2016.

More high school grads than ever are going to college, but 1 in 5 will quit

New data show little progress in retaining students, despite efforts to plug the leak

Sweet Briar College in Virginia. The liberal arts college was saved from closing only by the intervention of alumni and others.

With enrollment sliding, liberal arts colleges struggle to make a case for themselves

To thwart the skepticism of prospective students, some map job options, offer guarantees

University of Washington freshman Jenica Tran says it’s mostly up to students to make sure they graduate on time. “You can get the help if you go out to seek it, but you have to do it on your own,” she says.

Embattled colleges focus on an obvious fix: helping students graduate on time

While most students expect to earn degrees in four years, fewer than half actually do

“I never want to be in a neighborhood where I’m shot at again.”

A first-generation college graduate reflects on moving up America’s class ladder

Are America’s colleges promoting social mobility?

Economists dig into the data to understand which schools are doing the most to help revive the American Dream

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The University of La Verne near Los Angeles. The university makes it easier than most private colleges for students to transfer from other institutions.

Transfer students start getting more of the credits they’ve already earned

Pushed by enrollment slump and political pressure, colleges lower barriers to transfer

Students, employees scour college finances for waste, proof of unfair pay

As public confidence declines, university budgets and investments face growing scrutiny

Student Amalia Lewis-Miller at the Cuyahoga Community College Eastern campus, where a special program helped her finish on time. The program is being eliminated.

Worried about enrollment and judged on success, some colleges boost support

But the high price of helping a new generation of students creates a “dynamic tension”

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