Universities, Inc.

Universities run much like any other human institutions, something that seems as obvious as it has long been misunderstood. They need revenue, market themselves, and in general serve their self interest. We look at how American higher education operates in ways that many Americans may not know.

If Montana’s higher education property tax levy fails, “A lot of students aren’t going to be able to keep going to college,” says Kelly Armington, a University of Montana freshman majoring in communication studies.

Montana vote becomes a national referendum on public confidence in higher ed

A one-of-a-kind ballot question could be a bellwether of sentiment toward academia

Ebony McGee, a Vanderbilt University associate professor who studies diversity in education, in her office at Vanderbilt’s Peabody College. McGee says black faculty at predominantly white institutions are either ignored or closely scrutinized. “They don’t want to stay in that toxic environment, so they leave.”

After colleges promised to increase it, hiring of black faculty declined

Data show the proportion of nonwhite faculty is far smaller than of nonwhite students

Tuition is being cut by about $25,000 this year to attract more students to Mills College in Oakland, California, one of several colleges and universities freezing or reducing tuition this fall in the face of an enrollment decline and consumer backlash.

Bending to the law of supply and demand, some colleges are dropping their prices

Cuts to advertised tuition come in the face of an enrollment drop and consumer backlash

Textbook prices

Nothing says welcome to college like exorbitant textbook prices

When the cost of a textbook could feed a family of four for a week

Half of all Mississippi college graduates have loan debt

New report finds the average debt amount has increased for Mississippi grads

Alana Wolf was accepted to Cornell University, which told her to go somewhere else as a freshman and come back as a sophomore under a little-known policy called conditional admission. She spent her freshman year at Ithaca College and will enter Cornell this fall.

Seeking advantage, colleges are increasingly admitting students as sophomores

Some applicants are told: Start here after going somewhere else for freshman year

At least four colleges and universities in the Midwest alone have added certificate or associate degree programs in beer fermentation, brewing, brew management and wine and viticulture technology, among the 41,446 degree or certificate programs colleges and universities have added since 2012.

Panicked universities in search of students are adding thousands of new majors

Despite tight budgets and high risks, colleges hope niche degrees will spur demand

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North Carolina's attorney general shut down the Charlotte School of Law before it was scheduled to open this past fall.

As feds pull back, states step in to regulate for-profit colleges and universities

Securities filings show an industry increasingly vexed about state oversight, enforcement

The line between Texas and Arkansas in front of the bi-state federal building, which straddles both. Texas A&M University at Texarkana has one of the lowest retention rates of public higher-education institutions; 55 percent who started in 2012 were gone by 2016.

More high school grads than ever are going to college, but 1 in 5 will quit

New data show little progress in retaining students, despite efforts to plug the leak

Sweet Briar College in Virginia. The liberal arts college was saved from closing only by the intervention of alumni and others.

With enrollment sliding, liberal arts colleges struggle to make a case for themselves

To thwart the skepticism of prospective students, some map job options, offer guarantees

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