Universities, Inc.

Universities run much like any other human institutions, something that seems as obvious as it has long been misunderstood. They need revenue, market themselves, and in general serve their self interest. We look at how American higher education operates in ways that many Americans may not know.

HBCU international students

HBCUs open their doors wider to international students

The colleges are bringing in foreign students to give their campuses more international flavor, and help with the bottom line

Already stretched grad students rebel against rising and often surreptitious fees

Universities seeking revenue levy “academic excellence” and other non-tuition charges

College students are increasingly forgoing summers off to save money, stay on track

But with many four-year campuses shut down, students are turning to local community colleges

certificate programs

‘They just saw me as a dollar sign’: How some certificate schools profit from vulnerable students

When government turns a blind eye, for-profit colleges fail to fulfill promise of a fast path to a new career and leave students in debt

Erin Nelson, a recruiter from Iowa State University, talks with Emily Behrendsen, 17, and her mother, Diana, at a college fair in Pasadena, California. Emily’s older brother is going to Alaska for college, Diana Behrendsen says. “I just feel like they need to go where they can thrive and be happy.”

As college enrollment falls, recruiters descend on a state that still has lots of applicants

Institutions that are running out of students look to a place that has more than it can handle

Not going it alone: International education programs in an age of isolation

A sampling of Hechinger reporting for The New York Times’s Learning section

Kristie Kolesnikov, in red, spent 10 years getting her bachelor’s degrees at six different institutions. The mother of two can’t even keep track of how many credits she lost every time she changed majors or transferred. Now she’s working toward a master’s degree.

Universities that are recruiting older students often leave them floundering

Students 25 and older juggle jobs, kids and bills without support many say they need

Support
Our
Mission

Hi. Thanks to your support, we provide the best education coverage in the country.

Donate
College applications

In higher education, the wand chooses the wizard

It’s not Hufflepuff and Slytherin, it’s Harvard and Stanford

tuition free college

Sometimes politicians’ lofty promises of free college are too good to be true

Students are increasingly bumping up against the fine print in free-tuition programs

Colleges must stop holding students hostage and release their debt

Three colleges and a chamber of commerce in Michigan are helping students who need it

Prev
1
of
16
Next