Photo of Emmanuel Felton

Emmanuel Felton

Emmanuel Felton is a former staff writer. Prior to joining The Hechinger Report, he covered education, juvenile justice and child services for the New York World. He received a bachelor’s degree from Emory University and a master’s from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. He grew up in the music rich city of New Orleans, but learned the hard way that he had no musical talent during one very long week in middle school. Luckily, he found journalism.

Recent Stories

TOPS

How Louisiana’s richest students go to college on the backs of the poor

The state’s TOPS scholarship program and state budget formulas handicap less-advantaged students and colleges, and it’s a national trend

New Orleans finally has control of its own schools, but will all parents really have a say?

Can a locally elected school board bring true accountability to the city’s diffuse network of charter schools, or will the corruption and favoritism that plagued the city’s school board before Katrina return, giving an upper hand to savvy, well-connected parents and communities?

School district secessions gather speed, a new report shows

Wealthy school districts are increasingly splitting from poorer, more diverse ones, accelerating resegregation

The Martin Luther King Bridge, top, and Eads Bridge, bottom, connect East St. Louis with downtown St. Louis. Little of the economic boom that has transformed St. Louis has made it across the river.

Will turning schools into hubs for services help revive dying cities?

In East St. Louis, the school district is helping parents get back on their feet

Lake Oconee Academy is expanding. A new high school facility is under construction.

Nearly 750 charter schools are whiter than the nearby district schools

Loose laws let scores of charters create policies that favor white students

KIPP players on the sidelines at their game against Sophie B. Wright game.

City that loved and lost high school football finally gets it back

After ripping up an entire school district, charter schools try to mend fences by reviving Friday night lights

Kenyatta Burn works with her tutor at the Durham Literacy Center on Thursday, Nov. 20, 2017, in Durham, N.C.

Special education’s hidden racial gap

Across the country, black and Latino children with special needs are far less likely to graduate than their white peers

Ron Brown students filter into the room where the school holds daily school wide circles for students to talk.

A new attempt to answer an old question: Does single-sex education work?

A high school for boys of color in D.C. revives Afrocentric and single-sex schooling to close the achievement gap

School district secession

How the federal government abandoned the Brown v. Board of Education decision

It’s illegal to run schools designed to keep out black students, but the Department of Justice is letting districts get away with it

I got to choose private schools, but will vouchers really help other kids make it?

One of the first cities to embrace private school vouchers thinks not

Prev
1
of
8
Next