Matt Krupnick

Matt Krupnick is a freelance reporter and editor who contributes regularly to The New York Times and the Hechinger Report. He was a reporter with the Center for Public Integrity's State Integrity Investigation and is a member of Investigative Reporters and Editors and the Education Writers Association. He reported from Mexico while living in Oaxaca. Matt now lives in Brooklyn, N.Y., with his wife, cat and dog.

Recent Stories

Erin Nelson, a recruiter from Iowa State University, talks with Emily Behrendsen, 17, and her mother, Diana, at a college fair in Pasadena, California. Emily’s older brother is going to Alaska for college, Diana Behrendsen says. “I just feel like they need to go where they can thrive and be happy.”

As college enrollment falls, recruiters descend on a state that still has lots of applicants

Institutions that are running out of students look to a place that has more than it can handle

Brad Parton, a rancher and educator in Fayetteville, Tenn., feeds some of his 25 cows on his farm.

Rural colleges aren’t supplying the workers rural businesses and agriculture need

Both sides concede they don’t often talk to each other, resulting in a widening skills gap

Students at Walker Valley High School in Cleveland, Tennessee, work with machinery in the school’s mechatronics lab.

As jobs grow hard to fill, businesses join the drive to push rural residents toward college

Companies need more people with degrees but struggle to find them

A statue of George Mason on George Mason University's Fairfax campus in Fairfax, Virginia. The university offers digital badges rather than degrees or certificates for the completion of some courses.

As students flock to credentials other than degrees, quality-control concerns grow

Policymakers try to bring consistency to what “microcredentials” actually mean

Ebony McGee, a Vanderbilt University associate professor who studies diversity in education, in her office at Vanderbilt’s Peabody College. McGee says black faculty at predominantly white institutions are either ignored or closely scrutinized. “They don’t want to stay in that toxic environment, so they leave.”

After colleges promised to increase it, hiring of black faculty declined

Data show the proportion of nonwhite faculty is far smaller than of nonwhite students

Tuition is being cut by about $25,000 this year to attract more students to Mills College in Oakland, California, one of several colleges and universities freezing or reducing tuition this fall in the face of an enrollment decline and consumer backlash.

Bending to the law of supply and demand, some colleges are dropping their prices

Cuts to advertised tuition come in the face of an enrollment drop and consumer backlash

Roosevelt Montás, who spoke no English when he arrived in New York City from the Dominican Republic at age 12, leads Columbia University’s Freedom and Citizenship summer program for New York high school students.

Reading, writing and arguing: Can a summer of big questions push students to college?

High school students get jump-start studying great books, philosophers

Rutgers Newark sophomore Stacy Tyndall, 19, laughs at an

How one university is luring coveted honors students with social justice

To revitalize its home city, Rutgers University-Newark has started an honors program that looks beyond test scores to students' commitment to social change

Oil references are everywhere at Williston State College, at the heart of North Dakota’s Bakken oilfield.

For rural colleges, good vocational teachers are hard to find

A national shortage hits remote colleges often responsible for keeping their towns afloat

Even if they want to go to college, millions of adults live in higher education “deserts”

At least 25 miles from the nearest campus, they also don’t have internet speeds to study online

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