Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students.

Education financing

Education can be the great equalizer, but it isn’t yet

A level playing field for children will only come about if we pay for it

second language

What happens when college students discuss lab work in Spanish, philosophy in Chinese or opera in Italian?

A new movement has colleges adding second language sections to English-instructed courses 

college degree

More students are leaving college without a degree

More future jobs will require a college degree, yet more students are dropping out with no credential

“Canyon Dreams”

How one Navajo Nation high school is trying to help students see a future that includes college

In a new book on "rez ball," columnist Michael Powell explores the lives of Navajo high schoolers on and off the court

Black college students in Illinois get the short end of the financial stick

Illinois is spending more on higher ed overall but less on financial aid, as pension plans gobble funding

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Questioning their fairness, a record number of colleges stop requiring the SAT and ACT

Results are mixed, but suggest that making these tests optional is improving diversity on campus

Hispanic-serving institutions set to lose $100 million

Congressional leaders disagree about how to continue funding for colleges that serve minority students

OPINION: Do U.S. colleges reinforce or reduce inequality?

A reporter returns to college, after three decades away, to find out

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