Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students.

Clarissa Santana is a mother of three who is frustrated when she returns to college at the University of Akron and learns her credits from a for-profit school don’t transfer. She tells her story in the new documentary “Unlikely.”

Two new documentaries showcase a long and winding road to college

‘Personal Statement,’ and ‘Unlikely’ hit the film festival circuits with stories of real-life obstacles and struggles

How the Georgia governor’s race could influence college access there

Report finds Georgia’s public system has two tiers, limiting access for lower-income students

Not many of South Carolina’s African-American high school grads attend its flagship campus

A video report with University of South Carolina students and the college president

Myiesha Robateau wasn’t offered enough financial aid to go to a private college and instead began this fall at the public University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

New data show some colleges are definitively unaffordable for many

Even as net prices begin to fall at some schools, many families are priced out

OPINION: Faculty diversity? ‘When the guy in the white coat isn’t white, or a guy, every time’

Ways that campuses can increase the number of teachers who look like their students

Change is on the way for the College Scorecard

In its current state, the College Scorecard is not very useful for low-income students

Ebony McGee, a Vanderbilt University associate professor who studies diversity in education, in her office at Vanderbilt’s Peabody College. McGee says black faculty at predominantly white institutions are either ignored or closely scrutinized. “They don’t want to stay in that toxic environment, so they leave.”

After colleges promised to increase it, hiring of black faculty declined

Data show the proportion of nonwhite faculty is far smaller than of nonwhite students

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Inclusive campuses

OPINION: Making campus diversity real — starting in kindergarten

We need to examine the full educational journey

Damian Lopez, 4, gives Denver Public Schools Superintendent Tom Boabserg a high-five as he arrives for the first day of school at Escalante-Biggs Academy on August 20, 2018 in Denver, Colorado.

Take a closer look at those back-to-school photos: Is something missing?

School photos provide a snapshot of segregated schools from across the country

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