Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students.

OPINION: Do U.S. colleges reinforce or reduce inequality?

A reporter returns to college, after three decades away, to find out

historically underrepresented students

Flagship universities don’t reflect their state’s diversity

Across the country a gap persists between the number of black and Latino students graduating from state high schools, and the number enrolling in state flagship schools.

Luxury private student housing further divides rich and poor on campuses

Developers are pouring billions into buildings with pools, hot tubs, gyms and saunas

off-campus housing

The hidden risk in off-campus housing costs

As rents rise, living off-campus doesn’t always mean lower expenses

disproportionality in special education

New studies challenge the claim that black students are sent to special ed too much

Two quantitative studies find that black students are under-identified for disabilities at school

OPINION: Do our divided schools look like a scene out of ‘Mean Girls’ — or a slide into white nationalism?

Students report that they 'want more hard conversations in class'

A few universities help black and Hispanic students reach and finish graduate school

The ranks of such students, who are stymied by cost and inexperience, remain low

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High school graduation rates

High school graduation rates for one important group are starting to get better

How an ambitious plan to help Hispanics get ready for college is making early inroads

developmental preschool

Preschool for children with disabilities works, but federal funding for it is plummeting

Special education programs for preschoolers with disabilities are required by law. But as the number of students needing services has doubled, funding per child has decreased 40% in two decades

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