Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students.

Change is on the way for the College Scorecard

In its current state, the College Scorecard is not very useful for low-income students

Ebony McGee, a Vanderbilt University associate professor who studies diversity in education, in her office at Vanderbilt’s Peabody College. McGee says black faculty at predominantly white institutions are either ignored or closely scrutinized. “They don’t want to stay in that toxic environment, so they leave.”

After colleges promised to increase it, hiring of black faculty declined

Data show the proportion of nonwhite faculty is far smaller than of nonwhite students

Inclusive campuses

OPINION: Making campus diversity real — starting in kindergarten

We need to examine the full educational journey

Damian Lopez, 4, gives Denver Public Schools Superintendent Tom Boabserg a high-five as he arrives for the first day of school at Escalante-Biggs Academy on August 20, 2018 in Denver, Colorado.

Take a closer look at those back-to-school photos: Is something missing?

School photos provide a snapshot of segregated schools from across the country

The Old Manse, the centerpiece of Arkansas Baptist College in Little Rock. Federal data show that of the 201 low-income freshmen who began at the college in 2011, none had graduated six years later.

Billions in federal financial aid is going to students who aren’t graduating

First-ever formal look at biggest college grant fund exposes generally poor results

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For students teetering on the edge financially, micro-grants help them finish college

UNC-Charlotte finds 95 percent of completion-grant recipients stay on track to graduation

A graduate student working in science lab.

Too little aid for low-income STEM majors?

With an extra financial-aid boost, low-income students more likely to study science, technology, engineering or math, study finds

Teacher Catherine Connelly leads a lesson on giving compliments in Vista’s pioneering new class on social and emotional wellness. Connelly loved the curriculum, but not the rolling furniture.

A year of personalized learning: Mistakes, moving furniture and making it work

In the first year of a new program, a large San Diego district experiences small victories despite growing pains

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