Map to the Middle Class

The story of the future of work in America is one of deepening economic polarization. Good jobs are disappearing for people with only a high-school diploma, while wage and employment gains increasingly accrue to people with higher education. In this series, we’ll explore the jobs of the future and ask how schools can help young people prepare for a landscape where middle-class life is increasingly out of reach. To do that, we want to hear from you. See all our Special Reports

Freshman Arnaldo Gonzalez with his parents after the College Assistance Migrant Program celebration dinner in April.

A free sandwich can make the difference for some migrant worker children in college

For decades, a small federal program has been helping the students of farmworkers win at college with constant support

Las Vegas — A contestant plays Plinko on “The Price Is Right “ live at Bally’s Resort and Casino

OPINION: Choosing a career is no game for today’s students

Three ways to help students stay the high-stakes course

Sarat Atobajeun started as an apprentice with Zurich Insurance last August. She said she appreciates the stability of the job and the diversity of the tasks she’s learning.

Where are all the women apprentices?

Female and African-American workers earn far less than other participants in these increasingly popular workforce training programs

Teachers continue their strike at the state capitol on April 9, 2018 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Thousands of teachers and supporters continue to rally at the state Capitol as Oklahoma becomes the latest state to be plagued by teacher strife. Teachers are walking off the job after a $6,100 pay raise was rushed through the Legislature and signed into law by Gov. Mary Fallin.

If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you don’t work over the weekend, thank a union

The Janus Supreme Court ruling is bad news for all of us

“Since my parents didn’t get much education, it’s hard to talk to them about my schoolwork and applying to college, or how to plan my time and get everything done,” says Mariano Almanza, 18, pictured speaking with his Coronado High School guidance counselor, Colleen McElvogue.

School counselors keep kids on track. Why are they first to be cut?

How Colorado is betting on counseling to vault low-income kids into good jobs and post-secondary education

Lack of sufficient financial aid has forced Jocelyn Ramirez to work more than 40 hours a week and cut down on coursework so she can afford to stay in college.

Eligible for financial aid, nearly a million students never get it

States run out of money and aspiring low-income college students feel the pain

Wes McEntee works on one of several manufacturing machines students use at Vermont Technical College.

OPINION: 3 reasons that career and technical education doesn’t preclude college

Confronting some misconceptions about future learners

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Lande Ajose

OPINION: Latinos find the deck stacked against them in this state

Feeling the brunt of low wages and limited college access

Mitch Askew, a history teacher at Flagstaff High School, marches with his two-year-old son.

Are teachers losing their grip on the middle class?

Red-state teachers are walking out, not just over low pay but the erosion of their profession as a valued, white-collar occupation

Students walk on the campus of historical Morehouse College in Atlanta Ga.

We won’t have any black Mark Zuckerbergs or Bill Gates till we do this

Colleges that allow their students to also start businesses give them a boost

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