Map to the Middle Class

Questions at work

The Map to the Middle Class is a project that will explore what it takes to get to the middle class in an evolving economy

    

The story of work is one of deepening economic polarization. Good jobs are disappearing for people with only a high-school diploma, while wage and employment gains increasingly accrue to people with higher education. In this series, we’ll explore how trends such as automation could reshape the types of jobs that are available. And we’ll find out how schools can help young people prepare for a landscape where middle-class life is increasingly out of reach.

       
But to do that, we need to hear from you.
    
Here’s how it works: You ask. We report. We share the answer.
     
You could ask questions such as: Is my job safe from automation? Is getting a four-year college degree worth the cost? Are good jobs for people without college degrees ever coming back?
    
So what questions do you have about school, training programs and the path to the middle class? Ask your question here

Fifth graders Davonayshia Hollis, left, and Denaya Rippey, review a group entrepreneurial project for a parent-approved music device, developed in a mentorship program, Thursday May 19, 2016, at Brooklyn's P.S. 307 in New York. Startups and established tech companies are providing a crash course in entrepreneurship, sending engineers and designers into public schools to mentor students.

Not enough students have mentors, and we must change that

Internship programs that pair students with employers can help bridge the gap

GED and other high school equivalency degrees drop by more than 40% nationwide since 2012

Decline linked to 2014 change in exam and adult ed budget cuts, researcher says

A high school student repairs a car in an automotive shop class. Jobs in automotive body repair are relatively safe from automation, and they don't require a college degree.

Ten jobs that are safe from robots

A college degree, problem-solving skills and the ability to adapt to technological change will help land jobs at low risk for automation

Academia is beginning to offer courses in blockchain technology. Po Chi Wu, a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley, teaches a course about blockchain entrepreneurship.

Blockchain arrives on college campuses

The growing demand for scholarly research on blockchain and professionals with skills in the field is prompting universities to add coursework on the technology

technical education

OPINION: College or technical ed? Here’s why students need both

Work skills that count in the long haul

A graduate student working in science lab.

Too little aid for low-income STEM majors?

With an extra financial-aid boost, low-income students more likely to study science, technology, engineering or math, study finds

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Freshman Arnaldo Gonzalez with his parents after the College Assistance Migrant Program celebration dinner in April.

A free sandwich can make the difference for some migrant worker children in college

For decades, a small federal program has been helping the students of farmworkers win at college with constant support

Las Vegas — A contestant plays Plinko on “The Price Is Right “ live at Bally’s Resort and Casino

OPINION: Choosing a career is no game for today’s students

Three ways to help students stay the high-stakes course

Sarat Atobajeun started as an apprentice with Zurich Insurance last August. She said she appreciates the stability of the job and the diversity of the tasks she’s learning.

Where are all the women apprentices?

Female and African-American workers earn far less than other participants in these increasingly popular workforce training programs

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