Map to the Middle Class

Questions at work

The Map to the Middle Class is a project that will explore what it takes to get to the middle class in an evolving economy

The story of work is one of deepening economic polarization. Good jobs are disappearing for people with only a high-school diploma, while wage and employment gains increasingly accrue to people with higher education. In this series, we’ll explore how trends such as automation could reshape the types of jobs that are available. And we’ll find out how schools can help young people prepare for a landscape where middle-class life is increasingly out of reach.

But to do that, we need to hear from you.

Here’s how it works: You ask. We report. We share the answer.

You could ask questions such as: Is my job safe from automation? Is getting a four-year college degree worth the cost? Are good jobs for people without college degrees ever coming back?

So what questions do you have about school, training programs and the path to the middle class? Ask your question here

College dreams often melt away in summer months. ‘Near-peer’ counseling is helping keep them alive.

Eight years in, a program that helps low-income students stay on track to college is spreading — and showing results

OPINION: Higher education must not leave working families behind

Why short-term training programs make sense for both careers and budgets

What does ‘career readiness’ look like in middle school?

School districts are pushing career exploration into middle and lower grades, convinced the preparation necessary for tomorrow’s jobs needs to begin earlier

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Automation is remaking Mississippi jobs: Are workers ready?

New educational pathways are needed to prepare workers of all ages for tomorrow’s jobs

working in college

The paradox of working while in college

Work interferes with studies but boosts adult earnings, researchers say

What if we hired for skills, not degrees?

The last decade has seen widespread ‘degree inflation.’ But a growing movement of employers, workers and training groups offers a rebuke to a culture that exalts a bachelor’s as the gold standard for upward mobility

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