Higher education affordability

Erin Nelson, a recruiter from Iowa State University, talks with Emily Behrendsen, 17, and her mother, Diana, at a college fair in Pasadena, California. Emily’s older brother is going to Alaska for college, Diana Behrendsen says. “I just feel like they need to go where they can thrive and be happy.”

As college enrollment falls, recruiters descend on a state that still has lots of applicants

Institutions that are running out of students look to a place that has more than it can handle

Thousands of students cross the U.S.-Mexico border every day to go to college

Though many are U.S. citizens, they are still getting caught up in the anti-immigration climate

Automation is remaking Mississippi jobs: Are workers ready?

New educational pathways are needed to prepare workers of all ages for tomorrow’s jobs

college student success

One surprising barrier to college success: Dense higher education lingo

Some efforts are beginning to translate complex academic jargon into plain language

Education at Work

A new way of helping students pay for college: Give them corporate jobs

Some undergrads are answering customer service calls for Microsoft, Discover

Rural students often go unnoticed by colleges. Can virtual counseling put them on the map?

In rural high schools, college guidance is often inadequate or non-existent. But new programs are popping up to help  

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Universities try to catch up to their growing Latinx populations

Like many U.S. colleges, Indiana University Northwest is seeing a sharp rise in Latinx students — but support for them is lagging

Kristie Kolesnikov, in red, spent 10 years getting her bachelor’s degrees at six different institutions. The mother of two can’t even keep track of how many credits she lost every time she changed majors or transferred. Now she’s working toward a master’s degree.

Universities that are recruiting older students often leave them floundering

Students 25 and older juggle jobs, kids and bills without support many say they need

tuition free college

Sometimes politicians’ lofty promises of free college are too good to be true

Students are increasingly bumping up against the fine print in free-tuition programs

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