Law and policy

The Capitol, Washington, D.C.

OPINION: Eliminating the funding that supports educators? That’s no way to cut the federal budget

Impact would reverberate across entire communities

Internet access in schools: E-rate trends and the end of net neutrality

The federal E-rate program has increased classroom internet access, but net neutrality decision could hamper it

The United States Capitol.

OPINION: Is this tax plan a dream-crusher for higher ed’s food service workers, maintenance staff and housekeepers?

Youth whose parents staff America’s campuses face tuition-remission fees that would limit college access

Along with demonstrators, supporters of President Donald J. Trump showed up for the opening day of the new civil rights museum; one supporter looks at a list of those who were lynched. 

Never mind Trump’s visit — Mississippi’s new Civil Rights Museum is a real game changer for education

State’s racist history revealed in unsparing detail: ‘It hurts my heart’

Charter school leaders are complicit with segregation, and it’s hurting their movement

Proponents of charter schools have bought into the watered down notion of inclusion

In an era of inequity, more and more college financial aid is going to the rich

Poor students still get money, but higher-income classmates get a growing share

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A student takes a quiz at a high school in Ossining, N.Y.

States will soon be free to transform standardized testing, but most won’t

Even states that only grudgingly rely on multiple-choice tests may sit out an “innovative assessment” pilot

Katherine Kerwin, legislative affairs chair of the University of Wisconsin student government, leads efforts against letting public university students in Wisconsin opt out of paying fees to clubs and causes with which they disagree. “We can’t eliminate things because we’re so close-minded that we don’t want to pay for an organization that we don’t believe in,” she says.

Should college students’ money be paying for controversial speakers and programs?

Debate comes as universities shift more and more costs to students, including the bill for hot button speakers and polarizing clubs

New research questions the value of certificates pushed by colleges, policymakers

Studies suggest these popular credentials often don’t improve job prospects or pay

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