New Orleans

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina’s devastation, officials dramatically remade the long-struggling education system in New Orleans, turning it into the nation’s first all charter-school system. Our stories will look at what’s working — and what’s not — in the nation’s largest, most ambitious experiment with school decentralization.

The wealth that new schools should build

Educational institutions can uplift the community by providing jobs as well as degrees

The late New Orleans chef Leah Chase was a teacher at heart

Ms. Leah served food for thought along with her gumbo and shrimp Clemenceau

New Orleans finally has control of its own schools, but will all parents really have a say?

Can a locally elected school board bring true accountability to the city’s diffuse network of charter schools, or will the corruption and favoritism that plagued the city’s school board before Katrina return, giving an upper hand to savvy, well-connected parents and communities?

Charter schools nearly destroyed this New Orleans school. Now it will become one.

The first black high school in New Orleans, McDonogh 35, was a source of pride, until the chartering of the city’s schools after Hurricane Katrina contributed to its academic collapse. Now, the school board hopes turning it over to a charter organization can save it

How New Orleans leaders built a segregated city

Using schools as the building blocks, New Orleans leaders cemented residential segregation that persists today according to a new book

Marching in Mardi Gras, a New Orleans school that once struggled shows off

The alumni of a school demolished after Hurricane Katrina rallied to keep it alive after it was taken over by charter operators. A decade later, the school’s marching band is one sign of how far it’s come

Girls Coach Katie Lucky-Heard (left, white shirt) delivered a half-time pep talk to her team. “Tú puedes,” she said. You can do it.

Immigrant students once barred from sports can now play in Louisiana

The state’s athletic association lifts a rule requiring social security numbers after an outcry by educators and activists

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To un-muzzle upstart Negros, we need black-owned news media

Mainstream media generally reflects the views of the ruling class

Leona Tate, 64, who helped to desegregate the Deep South when she was six years old.

As a 6-year-old, Leona Tate helped desegregate schools. Now she wants others to learn that history

Tate plans to open an educational center in the New Orleans school she attended as one of only three black students in 1960

Charter school leaders should talk more about racism

Praising charters for “doing more with less” ignores how racist systems have devalued black communities, starving kids in both traditional and charter schools of resources

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