Graduation and dropouts

Universities try to catch up to their growing Latinx populations

Like many U.S. colleges, Indiana University Northwest is seeing a sharp rise in Latinx students — but support for them is lagging

Juab school district

In Utah, personalizing learning by focusing on relationships

This district says personalized learning boosted its graduation rate from 78 to 97 percent

Colleges must stop holding students hostage and release their debt

Three colleges and a chamber of commerce in Michigan are helping students who need it

What if we hired for skills, not degrees?

The last decade has seen widespread ‘degree inflation.’ But a growing movement of employers, workers and training groups offers a rebuke to a culture that exalts a bachelor’s as the gold standard for upward mobility

Charter schools nearly destroyed this New Orleans school. Now it will become one.

The first black high school in New Orleans, McDonogh 35, was a source of pride, until the chartering of the city’s schools after Hurricane Katrina contributed to its academic collapse. Now, the school board hopes turning it over to a charter organization can save it

After all the fuss about getting in, how do poor students survive on elite campuses?

A new book details obstacles, from encountering closed cafeterias to cleaning clogged toilets

Richard Carranza

STUDENT VOICES: NYC’s schools chief Richard Carranza promised us he’ll keep pushing for racial integration

Richard Carranza says he’ll resist criticism and fight for more integrated schools, including changing the admissions process for specialized high schools: “People are making lots of money on the backs of our students, our immigrant students, our poor families.”

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Marching in Mardi Gras, a New Orleans school that once struggled shows off

The alumni of a school demolished after Hurricane Katrina rallied to keep it alive after it was taken over by charter operators. A decade later, the school’s marching band is one sign of how far it’s come

New programs find ways to foster student resilience

A sampling of Hechinger reporting for The New York Times’s Learning section

A sign inside an AVID elective classroom tries to motivate students.

This program is helping fast-diversifying suburban schools promote success for all students

Georgia’s Fulton County is among a number of suburban districts turning to national nonprofit AVID to shrink achievement gaps and get kids of color ready for college

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