Graduation and dropouts

After all the fuss about getting in, how do poor students survive on elite campuses?

A new book details obstacles, from encountering closed cafeterias to cleaning clogged toilets

Richard Carranza

STUDENT VOICES: NYC’s schools chief Richard Carranza promised us he’ll keep pushing for racial integration

Richard Carranza says he’ll resist criticism and fight for more integrated schools, including changing the admissions process for specialized high schools: “People are making lots of money on the backs of our students, our immigrant students, our poor families.”

Marching in Mardi Gras, a New Orleans school that once struggled shows off

The alumni of a school demolished after Hurricane Katrina rallied to keep it alive after it was taken over by charter operators. A decade later, the school’s marching band is one sign of how far it’s come

New programs find ways to foster student resilience

A sampling of Hechinger reporting for The New York Times’s Learning section

A sign inside an AVID elective classroom tries to motivate students.

This program is helping fast-diversifying suburban schools promote success for all students

Georgia’s Fulton County is among a number of suburban districts turning to national nonprofit AVID to shrink achievement gaps and get kids of color ready for college

Army veteran Chester Dixon, right, works with William Moore, Georgia Department of Labor veterans representative, to apply for a new skills-based program to get out-of-work veterans trained and back in the job market, in Atlanta. The program is open to veterans between the ages of 35 and 60.

Going back to school after 50

A reader asks: How common is it for people seek out vocational training later in life?

When a college degree is no longer a ticket to the middle class

A reader asks: What’s the outlook for America’s middle class? And does a college degree still pave the way into it?

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High schoolers in a social studies class at Patchogue-Medford work on a lesson about the history of nationalism.

After a hate crime, a town welcomes immigrants into its schools

Patchogue, Long Island, site of a brutal anti-immigrant murder in 2008, has revamped its school programs to better assist young people fleeing violence in Central America

Adley Nyakora, a freshman at Minnesota State University, Mankato, plays Operation, while Cornelius Bright, Elijah Calderon-Pitchford, Aburrahman Guantai, and Jordan Headley look on.

Minnesota has a persistent higher-ed gap: Are new efforts making a difference?

Unless more residents get to and through college, the state won’t be able to fill jobs that require higher education

(Left to right) Carol Cannon and her son, Johnathan, welcome teachers Cathy Jack and Pamela George for the first of two visits the pair will make to their Hemphill, West Virginia, home. The second visit will follow early in the new year.

Home visiting in high school: Trying an intervention for toddlers on teenagers

A struggling West Virginia district sends teachers to students’ homes to help them get to college

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