Graduation and dropouts

New routes to success in learning are popping up around the country

A sampling of Hechinger reporting for The New York Times’s Learning section

Some colleges seek radical solutions to survive

Many schools are trying strategies from the business world to stay afloat

certificate programs

Will colleges with sky-high default rates face consequences?

New federal data reveals schools where more than half of students default on their loans. Will the government take action?

part-time students

Colleges and states turn their attention to slow-moving part-time students

Fewer than one in five students who go part time will graduate within even eight years

College dreams often melt away in summer months. ‘Near-peer’ counseling is helping keep them alive.

Eight years in, a program that helps low-income students stay on track to college is spreading — and showing results

To help first-generation students succeed, colleges enlist their parents

1 in 3 first-generation students quits college within three years. Can colleges boost grad rates by building relationships with students’ parents?

The messy reality of personalized learning

In Rhode Island, questions persist about the effectiveness of individualized instruction via laptop

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At the Telstar Freshman Academy in Maine, service learning is included as part of the curriculum. Bailey Fraser, 15 (left), and her stepsister Leah Kimball, 15, volunteer with Edible Bethel during their service learning block.

All ninth graders study at the local 4-H center in this Maine district

At Telstar Freshman Academy, outdoor-based projects are a way to raise students’ ambitions and keep them engaged

Universities try to catch up to their growing Latinx populations

Like many U.S. colleges, Indiana University Northwest is seeing a sharp rise in Latinx students — but support for them is lagging

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