Solutions

We explain what’s working, what’s not and what matters in education. Our stories are deeply researched, carefully written and rigorously edited. Our mission isn’t only to expose problems. We want to find out what’s being done to fix them and whether those solutions are working and can be replicated.

Chestnut Hill College director of student success Kim Cooney meets with senior Erin Crowley. Cooney changed her major at the end of her junior year in college, adding an extra semester to the time it took to graduate. Now she tries to help others make the right decisions sooner.

Switching majors is adding time and tuition to the already high cost of college

Despite the spiraling cost of the investment, some students commit to it without a plan

For safer schools, we need more hugs, not more guns

Students who feel disconnected from their community are more likely to lash out

New York City Schools Chancellor Harold Levy talks on the phone in his office in downtown Brooklyn, N.Y., Thursday, May 11, 2000. Levy, head of the country's largest school system, is pushing music and poetry in a system plagued with rats, guns and crumbling school buildings.

Remembering former NYC Schools Chancellor Harold Levy: A champion for children and a real mensch

Levy did many things in life, but most loved being chancellor

Mississippi parent Annita Bonner plays with her infant son before heading to work. The Too Small to Fail campaign is aimed at getting more parents to interact with their small children like Bonner is doing here.

When doctors say ‘Read,’ new parents listen

A campaign to get parents talking, reading and singing to their infants and toddlers by sending the message through pediatricians is working, new report shows

Sam Larson, 15, measures a section of his cardboard canoe during ANSEP’s summer Acceleration Academy at the University of Alaska in July 2018.

Alaska Native students pursue STEM, with great success

Pushing back against stereotypes, students in the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program outperform students of all backgrounds in math and science

Clarissa Santana is a mother of three who is frustrated when she returns to college at the University of Akron and learns her credits from a for-profit school don’t transfer. She tells her story in the new documentary “Unlikely.”

Two new documentaries showcase a long and winding road to college

‘Personal Statement,’ and ‘Unlikely’ hit the film festival circuits with stories of real-life obstacles and struggles

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TEACHER VOICE: We need phonics, along with other supports, for reading

Finding ‘a middle way for the good of students’

Preschool teacher Kayla Pinto works with a 4-year-old student at the Somerville YMCA in Somerville, Massachusetts. Pinto is working toward a bachelor’s degree, with the support of state programs that aim to increase college access for early childhood educators.

To boost preschool quality, Massachusetts invests in college degrees for teachers

State programs help early childhood educators earn bachelor’s degrees

Fifth graders Davonayshia Hollis, left, and Denaya Rippey, review a group entrepreneurial project for a parent-approved music device, developed in a mentorship program, Thursday May 19, 2016, at Brooklyn's P.S. 307 in New York. Startups and established tech companies are providing a crash course in entrepreneurship, sending engineers and designers into public schools to mentor students.

Not enough students have mentors, and we must change that

Internship programs that pair students with employers can help bridge the gap

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