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Higher Education Editor

Jon Marcus

Jon Marcus, higher-education editor, has written about higher education for the Washington Post, USA Today, Time, the Boston Globe, Washington Monthly, is North America higher-education correspondent for the Times (U.K.) Higher Education magazine, and contributed to the book Reinventing Higher Education. His Hechinger coverage has won national awards from the Education Writers Association and he was a finalist for an award for beat reporting from the New York chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The former editor of Boston magazine, Marcus holds a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and a bachelor’s degree from Bates College. A journalism instructor at Boston College, he says he ends up learning from his students far more than he teaches them.

Recent Stories

Sweet Briar College in Virginia. The liberal arts college was saved from closing only by the intervention of alumni and others.

With enrollment sliding, liberal arts colleges struggle to make a case for themselves

To thwart the skepticism of prospective students, some map job options, offer guarantees

University of Washington freshman Jenica Tran says it’s mostly up to students to make sure they graduate on time. “You can get the help if you go out to seek it, but you have to do it on your own,” she says.

Embattled colleges focus on an obvious fix: helping students graduate on time

While most students expect to earn degrees in four years, fewer than half actually do

Garret Morgan is training as an ironworker near Seattle, and already has a job that pays him $50,000 a year.

High-paying jobs go begging while high school grads line up for bachelor’s degrees

Huge shortages loom in the skilled trades, which require less — and cheaper — training

The University of La Verne near Los Angeles. The university makes it easier than most private colleges for students to transfer from other institutions.

Transfer students start getting more of the credits they’ve already earned

Pushed by enrollment slump and political pressure, colleges lower barriers to transfer

Allison Dinsmore and her boyfriend, Grant Montgomery, students at California’s Newark Memorial High School. Montgomery says college recruiters seldom come to their school.

Silicon Valley aims its tech at helping low-income kids get beyond high school

New platform gives some students a message they rarely hear: They can go to college

Students, employees scour college finances for waste, proof of unfair pay

As public confidence declines, university budgets and investments face growing scrutiny

David Andy, who is enrolled in a program in advanced manufacturing at Metro State University in Denver designed in collaboration with employers.

Worker shortage spurs uncharacteristic partnerships connecting colleges, business

One state tries to close the odd divide between what students learn and employers need

The “Great Dome” on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which is hosting an experimental program to recruit physicists, engineers, chemists, linguists, biologists, neuroscientists and other experts and train them to be primary and secondary school teachers. The candidates’ previous experience and skills will help speed them through the process.

New, MIT-based program proposes transforming physicists, engineers into teachers

High-tech effort would also speed up teacher education by giving credit for existing skills

Olympic hopeful figure skater Max Aaron on the practice rink in Colorado Springs. Aaron, who is 25, earned a degree in finance in December. He worked as a barback and a waiter on the weekends to help pay the tuition and took his classes early in the morning and late at night to accommodate his training schedule.

Even with help, Olympic athletes struggle to balance their sports with college

Their stories illustrate how, for older students, getting a degree is like skating uphill

University enrollment decline continues into sixth straight year

Numbers fall at all levels, with the drop in first-year students speeding up

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