New Orleans

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina’s devastation, officials dramatically remade the long-struggling education system in New Orleans, turning it into the nation’s first all charter-school system. Our stories will look at what’s working — and what’s not — in the nation’s largest, most ambitious experiment with school decentralization. See all our Special Reports

Charter school leaders are complicit with segregation, and it’s hurting their movement

Proponents of charter schools have bought into the watered down notion of inclusion

More charter schools means fewer early education options, new research shows

In New Orleans, a study finds that charters don’t have incentives to offer PreK

KIPP players on the sidelines at their game against Sophie B. Wright game.

City that loved and lost high school football finally gets it back

After ripping up an entire school district, charter schools try to mend fences by reviving Friday night lights

A school bus drops off a student in front of the Claiborne Bridge in the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Tolerating failing schools in New Orleans — so long as they’re for black kids

The post-Katrina education reform shook up the school system; it’s time to do it again

A little girl’s school helps her deal with trauma at home

At home, schizophrenia, addiction and violence. At school, grown-ups who care

Second grade teacher Lynnon Carney helps a student with math at Arise Academy.

Charter schools aren’t measuring up to their promises

Ambitious goals were not uncommon in New Orleans charter schools, but rarely achieved

Don’t ever conflate disaster recovery with education reform

Katrina (and now maybe Harvey and Irma) attracted educational opportunists who looked past children and families

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Open letter to teachers who feel trapped in racist schools

Children have to be taught how to hate each other

Third-grade campers spend the morning doing academic work; afternoons are reserved for enrichment classes like basketball, poetry, or drama.

A New Orleans summer teaching fellowship is wooing young black teachers — but is it enough?

In an effort to correct the post-Katrina mass hiring, and subsequent high turnover, of inexperienced white teachers, educators in New Orleans are exploring how to attract and retain black teachers

When the firing of a principal raises bigger questions than one person’s bigotry

Dismantling racist policies is harder than destroying tangible symbols of racism

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