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Columnist

Chris Berdik

Chris Berdik is a science journalist who has written about a wide variety of topics, including the intersection of science with ethical issues and the peculiarities of the human brain. (“Why Our Brains Make Us Laugh,” for the Boston Globe, for example.) His book, Mind Over Mind: The Surprising Power of Expectations, was published by Current, an imprint of Penguin, in 2012. A Harvard graduate with a master’s degree in journalism from Stanford University, Mr. Berdik has been a staff editor at The Atlantic and Mother Jones. His freelance articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Boston Globe and Boston Magazine, among others, and his radio and multimedia stories have appeared on Smithsonian.com, WBUR (Boston’s NPR station) and Sciencestage.com, among others.

Recent Stories

Shawn Caine, who teaches technology at Panguitch High School in Garfield County, Utah, lets students who don't have adequate home internet service get online in her classroom before and after school.

Will a new push for free wireless internet help rural students get online?

Pending FCC rule change could help close the ‘homework gap’

Northern Cass student Katelyn Stavenes taking part in the Jaguar Academy pilot, a piece of the district’s plan to eliminate grade levels by the fall of 2020.

What’s school without grade levels?

One district’s drive to teach competencies means eliminating age-based classrooms

How students learn from super green schools that use zero energy

Finding “vampires,” angling solar panels, tracking cafeteria waste – all become lessons

Students in a marketing course at Roger Williams University in Rhode Island check their phones before class begins. To tame classroom distraction, their professor uses Flipd, an app that locks students out of their phones during class.

Dealing with digital distraction

Solutions run the gamut—from tech breaks to tech take-overs

How one Chicago high school turned the corner using full-time internships

Real-World Learning gets real: Could the key to school success be spending less time in school?

Many schools could beam the internet into students’ homes — if the bandwidth hadn’t already been sold to businesses

Frequencies long ago set aside for education—but since gobbled up by business—could help close the “homework gap.”

Come for the computers, stay for the books

Libraries are re-booting to become the tech hub for schools

A school district is building a DIY broadband network

Internet will be beamed into student homes on frequencies set aside for schools decades ago -- but mostly sold off to business since then

Movie magic could be used to translate for the deaf

The developing technology could bring great leaps in learning

Making America whole again via civics education

Using online games and other ed-tech tools to bridge the partisan divide

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