Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students.

Getting rid of the ‘gotcha’: College students try to tame political dialogue

Rebelling against political discourse that polarizes people, new campus groups seek common ground and informed discussion of hot-button topics

federal work study program

Do federal work-study jobs prepare students for careers – and should they?

The Trump Administration proposes cutting work-study funding almost by half

Even at elite colleges lauded for their generosity, some students take on debt

And those from low-income backgrounds are more likely to have trouble paying it back

OPINION: ‘Free college’ fails to address racial and class gaps

Policy partnerships to make higher ed affordable for those with the most need

Colleges start looking for ways to house and feed their students who are homeless

Often demanded by fellow students, small fixes chip away at a surprisingly big problem

Operation Varsity Blues proves we need affirmative action

Affirmative action isn’t the problem, it’s wealthy parents who are robbing underrepresented groups of opportunities to climb the social ladder.

NACAC college fair

A big reason rural students never go to college: Colleges don’t recruit them

College recruiters who flock to suburban high schools seldom visit rural ones

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Brad Parton, a rancher and educator in Fayetteville, Tenn., feeds some of his 25 cows on his farm.

Rural colleges aren’t supplying the workers rural businesses and agriculture need

Both sides concede they don’t often talk to each other, resulting in a widening skills gap

Students at Walker Valley High School in Cleveland, Tennessee, work with machinery in the school’s mechatronics lab.

As jobs grow hard to fill, businesses join the drive to push rural residents toward college

Companies need more people with degrees but struggle to find them

Adley Nyakora, a freshman at Minnesota State University, Mankato, plays Operation, while Cornelius Bright, Elijah Calderon-Pitchford, Aburrahman Guantai, and Jordan Headley look on.

Minnesota has a persistent higher-ed gap: Are new efforts making a difference?

Unless more residents get to and through college, the state won’t be able to fill jobs that require higher education

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