Adult learning

“Canyon Dreams”

How one Navajo Nation high school is trying to help students see a future that includes college

In a new book on "rez ball," columnist Michael Powell explores the lives of Navajo high schoolers on and off the court

New routes to success in learning are popping up around the country

A sampling of Hechinger reporting for The New York Times’s Learning section

certificate programs

Will colleges with sky-high default rates face consequences?

New federal data reveals schools where more than half of students default on their loans. Will the government take action?

prison education programs

Propelling prisoners to bachelor’s degrees in California

As the First Step Act is set to release more federal prisoners and Congress considers offering additional inmates financial aid for college, California’s overhaul of prison education offers a blueprint for other states.

From prison to dean’s list: How Danielle Metz got an education after incarceration

Just 4 percent of formerly incarcerated people have a bachelor’s degree. Now, a movement to raise that number is gaining momentum as Congress reconsiders a ban on Pell grants for prisoners, and some states seek to prevent universities from barring felons

Automation is remaking Mississippi jobs: Are workers ready?

New educational pathways are needed to prepare workers of all ages for tomorrow’s jobs

Universities increasingly turn to graduate programs to balance their books

The survival strategy is raising prices and increasing debt for graduate students

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Army veteran Chester Dixon, right, works with William Moore, Georgia Department of Labor veterans representative, to apply for a new skills-based program to get out-of-work veterans trained and back in the job market, in Atlanta. The program is open to veterans between the ages of 35 and 60.

Going back to school after 50

A reader asks: How common is it for people seek out vocational training later in life?

Data analysis reveals keys to student success

With nearly 3 million datapoints, Trilogy Education says it knows exactly what it takes to keep students on track

Jobs in information technology are growing quickly and employers are trying to find ways to get kids excited about careers in the field.

How do schools train for a workplace that doesn’t exist yet?

A reader asks: Not knowing what tasks will be automated or what future jobs will look like, how should schools prepare students now?

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