Discipline

twice exceptional students

Twice exceptional, doubly disadvantaged? How schools struggle to serve gifted students with disabilities

Parents say it’s often impossible to find schools to educate bright kids who have disabilities. Now some are fighting to change that

Teachers go to school on racial bias

Boston-area schools are leading a shift toward culturally responsive teaching. Educators say the resulting conversations about race are difficult, uncomfortable — and absolutely necessary

The Hankinses with their son David. A family court judge rejected the New York City Department of Education’s allegation that the couple had neglected their child by keeping him out of school and having “unrealistic expectations” for his education.

When schools use child protective services as a weapon against parents

Many school employees are legally obligated to report any suspicion of child abuse and neglect, but sometimes that authority is misused

Oliver Francis, of Philadelphia, was placed in foster care because he was truant. He graduated from George Junior Republic, a residential school in Grove City, Pennsylvania, this spring.

Institutions for foster kids aren’t doing enough to educate them

Missing credits and easy, worksheet-based education add to the learning challenges of children in foster care

TEACHER VOICE: Justice and equity for all students? We aren’t there yet

Why DeVos should renew the U.S. Department of Education’s commitment to fostering positive school cultures

Tessa, 7, of Lafayette, Indiana, reads a book in her bright pink bedroom.

The opioid crisis took their parents, now foster kids left behind are being failed again

Teachers and school administrators are on the front lines of this crisis, but often aren't given the tools to help

Restorative justice is about more than just reducing suspensions

Psychologists are exploring how traditional disciplinary tactics fall short and why community-minded alternatives are worth exploring

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Neuroscientists have found that curious students learn better because their brain activity changes in ways that help them retain new information. Now researchers are testing ways to encourage that curiosity — for example, by encouraging teachers to model inquisitive behavior.

Piqued: The case for curiosity

Scientists are discovering that curious learners from low-income households perform as well as affluent students

Students at a charter school near Washington, D.C.

Dress codes can’t cover for bad teaching

Rules for black girls abound, and provide more opportunity for punishment

A sign on the door of a KIPP Charter school in the Bronx. KIPP's co-founder, Mike Feinberg, was recently fired due to allegations of sexual abuse.

It was only a matter of time before the #MeToo movement rocked schools

It’s not just sexual harassment, but physical and verbal abuse too, that needs to be outed

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