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Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Dickinson is among a growing number of colleges and universities that involve their faculty in watching for problems that could derail students — something not traditionally considered their role.

At a growing number of colleges, faculty get a new role: spotting troubled students

On most campuses, however, ensuring students succeed is still not considered part of the job

Ebony McGee, a Vanderbilt University associate professor who studies diversity in education, in her office at Vanderbilt’s Peabody College. McGee says black faculty at predominantly white institutions are either ignored or closely scrutinized. “They don’t want to stay in that toxic environment, so they leave.”

After colleges promised to increase it, hiring of black faculty declined

Data show the proportion of nonwhite faculty is far smaller than of nonwhite students

Poverty, Perseverance and a PhD

An elite university helped her climb but changing class can be a lonely journey.

What do college students learn

As students return to college, a basic question persists: What are they learning?

Despite years of demands, consumers know little about how and how much students learn

Keith Murphy, recovery counselor, and Lisa Laitman, director of the Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program, speaking with a resident of the Rutgers University Recovery House.

A new challenge for colleges: opioid-addicted students

Driven by deaths or state pressure, institutions are opening “recovery houses”

Grinnell College, halfway between Des Moines and Iowa City. First-year students here attend a mandatory career advising program before their classes even start.

Colleges welcome first-year students by getting them thinking about jobs

Increasingly judged on graduates’ success, some start career advising very, very early

Old Idea, New Economy: Rediscovering Apprenticeships

You might think apprenticeships are a relic from an earlier era, but a growing number of Americans are using them as a way into the middle class. South Carolina has…

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Tuition is being cut by about $25,000 this year to attract more students to Mills College in Oakland, California, one of several colleges and universities freezing or reducing tuition this fall in the face of an enrollment decline and consumer backlash.

Bending to the law of supply and demand, some colleges are dropping their prices

Cuts to advertised tuition come in the face of an enrollment drop and consumer backlash

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