Higher education access

A sign inside an AVID elective classroom tries to motivate students.

This program is helping fast-diversifying suburban schools promote success for all students

Georgia’s Fulton County is among a number of suburban districts turning to national nonprofit AVID to shrink achievement gaps and get kids of color ready for college

tribal colleges

Why are tribal college students slow to ask for financial aid?

A report about student experiences at tribal colleges and universities finds a lag in seeking aid, along with reluctance to take out loans

Army veteran Chester Dixon, right, works with William Moore, Georgia Department of Labor veterans representative, to apply for a new skills-based program to get out-of-work veterans trained and back in the job market, in Atlanta. The program is open to veterans between the ages of 35 and 60.

Going back to school after 50

A reader asks: How common is it for people seek out vocational training later in life?

The other victims when colleges decline or close: their hometowns

Growing financial woes in higher education threaten surrounding economies

When a college degree is no longer a ticket to the middle class

A reader asks: What’s the outlook for America’s middle class? And does a college degree still pave the way into it?

Jobs in information technology are growing quickly and employers are trying to find ways to get kids excited about careers in the field.

How do schools train for a workplace that doesn’t exist yet?

A reader asks: Not knowing what tasks will be automated or what future jobs will look like, how should schools prepare students now?

The Thompson family, (from left) Clive, CJ, Christine, Oneita and Timothy, stand in the sanctuary of the First United Methodist Church of Germantown, where the parents and their two youngest children have been living since August.

Going to school when your family is in hiding from ICE

ICE allowed a Jamaican family to stay in the country for years, then suddenly ordered them deported last summer. Now, as the family seeks sanctuary in a church, the children are struggling to maintain their grades and dreams of college

Support
Our
Mission

Hi. Thanks to your support, we provide the best education coverage in the country.

Donate
Brad Parton, a rancher and educator in Fayetteville, Tenn., feeds some of his 25 cows on his farm.

Rural colleges aren’t supplying the workers rural businesses and agriculture need

Both sides concede they don’t often talk to each other, resulting in a widening skills gap

U.S. continues to slip behind other countries in percentage of population with degrees

A lack of highly skilled workers leaves American employers unable to fill jobs

Students at Walker Valley High School in Cleveland, Tennessee, work with machinery in the school’s mechatronics lab.

As jobs grow hard to fill, businesses join the drive to push rural residents toward college

Companies need more people with degrees but struggle to find them

Prev
1
of
21
Next