Photo of Sarah Garland

Executive Editor

Sarah Garland

Sarah Garland is the executive editor of The Hechinger Report. She started out in journalism reporting on murders and mayhem in New York City for New York Newsday and the New York Times, before joining the New York Sun, where she discovered a passion for the education beat. As a Spencer Fellow in Education Reporting at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, she wrote "Divided We Fail" (Beacon Press), a narrative of the landmark enactment and repeal of court-ordered school desegregation in her hometown of Louisville, KY. Garland is a graduate of Macalester College in St. Paul and has a joint master’s degree in journalism and Latin American studies from New York University. In 2009, Garland published her second book, "Gangs in Garden City," about Salvadoran street gangs in the Long Island suburbs. Her first book, "The Haunted Kitchen," was awarded the best entry by a third grader at Coleridge-Taylor Elementary. During the really cool and somewhat dangerous field trips hosted by her public elementary and middle schools, Garland learned to sail a tall ship, developed a phobia of underwater caves, and cooked pancakes "like a pioneer" over an open fire.

Recent Stories

A high school library in a school district in Mentor, Ohio, was redesigned to fit the school’s vision for blended learning.

Readers and Knight invest in real news about schools

We've raised nearly $20,000 to continue our work covering inequality and innovation in schools and on campuses. Help us reach our goal of raising $25,000.

Horgan Elementary School first-grader Evelina Lucas, right, helps her Chromebook buddy, kindergartener Emily Zhang, in a graphing exercise.

Personalized learning and Common Core: Mortal enemies?

First-grader Evelina Lucas, right, helps her Chromebook buddy, kindergartener Emily Zhang, in a graphing exercise. Photo: Gretchen Ertl Can students learn about what they like, at…

On a classroom-based test for new teachers, black teachers score lower

A new report shows gap on the edTPA and researchers want to find out why

“They only kill us because of our skin color and our race.”

What kids worried about during a year of police violence

Lori Smith (left) and Heather Hobbs (right), two teacher leaders in the Kingsport City Schools district, participate in a Common Core training session in Kingsport, Tenn.

Why don’t more teachers like the edTPA?

Two studies give an on-the-job teaching test mixed reviews

In Texas, new math standards look a whole lot like Common Core

A national trend to overhaul math touches classrooms even in a place where Common Core is illegal

The end of “no excuses” education reform?

A Philadelphia charter school CEO leads the way as more schools question the get-tough school model

How high school would be different if students could design it

At a kid-designed high school, more technology and dancing in the halls, less testing

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