For-Profit Colleges

For-profit institutions have come under fire for saddling students with too much debt and not enough job options, even as enrollment has nearly tripled to 1.8 million since 2000. New federal regulations are aimed squarely at the booming businesses, threatening to cut off student aid if too many graduates default on their loans. See all our Special Reports

For-profit colleges lose when two-year colleges offer B.A. degrees

Traditional four-year schools see boost in degrees when community colleges compete

In 2015 and 2016, 3.9 million college students dropped out of college with debt, Jill Barshay wrote in The Hechinger Report. Data from College Scorecard of the U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics.

OPINION: Can ‘risk-share’ financial aid models reverse some ‘alarming data’ on student completion rates?

Strayer’s president on ‘skin in the game’ and an incentive program that’s working

Federal data shows 3.9 million students dropped out of college with debt in 2015 and 2016

For-profit sector produced a disproportionate share of indebted dropouts

A bid to show which colleges are worth the money reveals some surprises

Latest “gainful-employment” data show problems are not limited to for-profit schools

For-profit colleges stay quietly on offense

Money to Congress and for lobbying continues to flow

Under pressure, groups that assess colleges promise to take a closer look at graduation rates

Accreditation organizations will also examine loan default rates

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Some surprising reasons companies are rushing to help their workers get degrees

The fine print behind the seemingly civic-spirited return to tuition reimbursement benefits

Seeking a fresh start, battered for-profit colleges give themselves a new name

Rebranding highlights a three-year strategy to reverse dramatic enrollment declines

Once-high-flying private, for-profit universities seek turnaround strategies

After crackdowns, bad PR, and crashing enrollments, schools turn back to roots

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