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Hundreds of thousands of people could lose their legal status. One hopes to graduate with his college degree first

If the Trump administration has its way, Jose would be forced from the U.S. just a few months before graduation.

Despite decades of pledging to hire more black faculty, most universities didn’t

The number of black faculty on college campuses has gone down during the last decade.

As they lose customers, universities try expanding the menu

Colleges nationwide have added more than 40,000 new degree and certificate programs in last six years, but are they better serving students?

Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on his nomination be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.

In the fight over Kavanaugh, echoes of a battle being waged on college campuses nationwide

Across the country, schools wrestle with how sexual assault is defined and how much proof is needed.

Poverty, Perseverance and a PhD

An elite university helped her climb but changing class can be a lonely journey.

Old Idea, New Economy: Rediscovering Apprenticeships

You might think apprenticeships are a relic from an earlier era, but a growing number of Americans are using them as a way into the middle class. South Carolina has…

Are colleges helping Americans move up?

Colleges have long offered a pathway to success for just about anyone. But new research shows that, with the country growing ever more economically divided, colleges are not doing enough to help students from poor families achieve the American dream.

School on the move

A little-known program has been helping the children of migrant farmworkers graduate for more than 50 years.

Two days before the walkout, teachers and support staff from across the Flagstaff Unified School District, two hours north of Phoenix, gathered for an information and strategy session. Everyone took home a Red for Ed yard sign. 

Edged out of the middle class, teachers are walking out

Dissatisfied with low pay and school funding, teachers in more red states are poised to protest.

State financial-aid money dries up before many low-income college students get help

Last year, almost a million students who qualified for state financial aid didn’t get it.

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