Photo of Sarah Gonser

Sarah Gonser

Sarah Gonser is a contributing writer. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic and numerous other media outlets. Her first job in journalism was as the obituary writer for a California daily newspaper. She attended public elementary and middle school in French-speaking rural Switzerland where field trips consisted of hiking, or cross-country skiing, from dawn until dusk.

Recent Stories

A high school student repairs a car in an automotive shop class. Jobs in automotive body repair are relatively safe from automation, and they don't require a college degree.

Ten jobs that are safe from robots

A college degree, problem-solving skills and the ability to adapt to technological change will help land jobs at low risk for automation

Academia is beginning to offer courses in blockchain technology. Po Chi Wu, a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley, teaches a course about blockchain entrepreneurship.

Blockchain arrives on college campuses

The growing demand for scholarly research on blockchain and professionals with skills in the field is prompting universities to add coursework on the technology

Two educators discuss how and when race, or racism, showed up in their classrooms at the Border Crossers training.

How social studies can help young kids make sense of the world

Civic engagement matters today more than ever, yet social studies in the early grades are sidelined. To make up for this absence, some educators seek outside training on how to handle sensitive issues in the classroom

Rosy Taveras, a kindergarten teacher at P.S. 218 in the Bronx, models fluent and expressive reading.

How to help struggling young readers

Children who can’t read well by third grade are more likely to become drop-outs. Research-based coaching could make a critical difference.

Small-group math work at Prairie Oak Elementary in Berwyn North School District 98 where, two years ago, just 14 percent of third-graders were able to do grade-level math.

How to boost math skills in the early grades

Early math skills, though critical to academic success, get far less attention than literacy in high-poverty classrooms. One Illinois school district is working to change that.

“Since my parents didn’t get much education, it’s hard to talk to them about my schoolwork and applying to college, or how to plan my time and get everything done,” says Mariano Almanza, 18, pictured speaking with his Coronado High School guidance counselor, Colleen McElvogue.

School counselors keep kids on track. Why are they first to be cut?

How Colorado is betting on counseling to vault low-income kids into good jobs and post-secondary education

Revamped and rigorous, career and technical education is ready to be taken seriously

How one New Hampshire school is preparing students in the face of a looming labor crisis

In an effort to get more girls at Red Bank to participate in the cybersecurity challenge, teacher Mandy Galante, center, recruited girls from nontech classes, including a dozen from a creative writing class. “We want to get the girls who never even thought of doing this,” she said.

Jobs in cybersecurity are exploding: Why are women locked out?

How high schools are trying to attract girls to this lucrative tech field

The sun rises over Branch Street in Lowell, Massachusetts.

Out of poverty, into the middle class

As automation disrupts the labor market and good middle-class jobs disappear, schools are struggling to equip students with future-proof skills

“I had moments last semester when I didn’t want to study anymore. I thought: I’ll just work my job and get paid, and that’s it,” said Zuleima Dominguez, a student at Hunter College.

Undocumented high schoolers work long hours, putting college further out of reach

Working to support themselves and their families through the high school years hits undocumented teens disproportionally hard. Three young people describe their paths to higher education.

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