Immigration

Just over 3 percent of children under 18 living in America were foreign-born in 2013. In striving to make it through the K-12 system and on to higher education, this small but important portion of public school students faces special challenges.

Washington, D.C. – West Front Plaza and façade of the U.S. Supreme court building.

OPINION: DACA isn’t ‘the sweeping magic wand of access that higher education made it seem to be’

What states and institutions can do to increase higher-education access independent of DACA

immigrants

We are a nation of migrants, not a collection of diplomas

The rush to embrace only highly educated immigrants reveals our classist elitism

Universities try to catch up to their growing Latinx populations

Like many U.S. colleges, Indiana University Northwest is seeing a sharp rise in Latinx students — but support for them is lagging

Por qué un distrito escolar de Texas ayuda a inmigrantes que enfrentan la deportación

En lo profundo de territorio pro-Trump, un superintendente ayuda a sus alumnos y a sus familias a continuar sus vidas tras una redada del Servicio de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas (ICE, por sus siglas en inglés)

New programs find ways to foster student resilience

A sampling of Hechinger reporting for The New York Times’s Learning section

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OPINION: How one school came together to create a safe place for immigrants

Empowering teachers to lead the way

High schoolers in a social studies class at Patchogue-Medford work on a lesson about the history of nationalism.

After a hate crime, a town welcomes immigrants into its schools

Patchogue, Long Island, site of a brutal anti-immigrant murder in 2008, has revamped its school programs to better assist young people fleeing violence in Central America

The Thompson family, (from left) Clive, CJ, Christine, Oneita and Timothy, stand in the sanctuary of the First United Methodist Church of Germantown, where the parents and their two youngest children have been living since August.

Going to school when your family is in hiding from ICE

ICE allowed a Jamaican family to stay in the country for years, then suddenly ordered them deported last summer. Now, as the family seeks sanctuary in a church, the children are struggling to maintain their grades and dreams of college

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