Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students. See all our Special Reports

A program helps low-income parents graduate at twice the rate of other community college students

Graduation rates in Arkansas have improved for all racial groups under this program

Even though more than half of Mississippi’s public high school graduates in 2015 were African American, they only made up 10 percent of that fall’s freshman class at the University of Mississippi.

Many state flagship universities leave black and Latino students behind

Most sought-after public universities often don’t reflect their state populations, new Hechinger Report analysis shows

Andrea Laminack, a female welder, talks to Nikki Bond, a prospective student, at an open house at West Georgia Technical College for women interested in vocational trades.

In spite of a growing shortage in male-dominated vocations, women still aren’t showing up

One group of prospective tradespeople is forgoing the highest-paying fields -- women

Tiana Young is a freshman at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, where a racist Facebook post from a student in the alt-right group Turning Point left the African-American community shaken and frustrated by the school's lack of public response.

To attract more blacks and Hispanics to STEM, universities must address racial issues on campus

STEM universities aren’t doing enough to make students feel welcome and close racial gaps, students and experts say

TEACHER VOICE: It’s time to shatter the silence about race

Five steps toward fostering change

A girl at recess runs at the Heart Butte School on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in northern Montana. Overshadowed by attention to the challenges faced by nonwhite high school graduates in cities, low-income black, Hispanic and native American students in rural areas are equally unlikely to go on to college.

Economics, culture and distance conspire to keep rural nonwhites from higher educations

Eclipsed by urban counterparts, rural nonwhites go to college at equally low rates

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McMicken Heights Elementary School principal Alexandria Haas sits with second-graders during a morning activity developed by the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. Students take 20 minutes each day to work on social interactions and understanding their emotions.

Is the effort to curb strict discipline going too far, too fast?

One Washington State school district shows just how difficult it can be to quickly reduce suspensions without alienating teachers

Harvard Law grad helps low-income kids aim high

While many high schools push poor students toward less competitive college, this New York nonprofit helps to graduate kids from top-tier schools at remarkable rates

Internet access in schools: E-rate trends and the end of net neutrality

The federal E-rate program has increased classroom internet access, but net neutrality decision could hamper it

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