Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students. See all our Special Reports

A mother and son go from homeless to college

New York’s free tuition plan won’t help the neediest students. Should it?

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Trump budget doesn’t cover Pell Grants to be used for college summer courses

Idea, which has bipartisan support, would help speed low-income students to degrees

Study: Half or more of community college students struggle to afford food, housing

Biggest-ever survey on the topic also suggests that 14 percent of students are homeless

Good news for college applicants: Getting in is easier than they think

… or than many colleges and universities want them to know

Similar students, different results: where black college students do best, and worst

And putting HBCUs in context reveals better graduation rates

A racially charged assault spurs schools to rally behind Portland’s large refugee community

‘Welcoming refugees is not a political issue. It’s about people.’

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OPINION: Is a two-year college sometimes the best path to a four-year degree?

Looking back, student says going to community college first would have been the smart choice

OPINION: Six tips for going to college and working full-time, from a student struggling to do both

“I just want to quit my job so I can focus on my education. But how can I?”

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