Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students. See all our Special Reports

Idaho gives education money directly to teenagers to manage themselves

Every seventh grader gets $4,125 to spend on early college credits, other extras

What some colleges are quietly doing to help undocumented students

With sanctuary promises untested, institutions offer other long-sought help

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FROM THE ARCHIVES: Trump budget doesn’t cover Pell Grants to be used for college summer courses

Idea, which has bipartisan support, would help speed low-income students to degrees

Study: Half or more of community college students struggle to afford food, housing

Biggest-ever survey on the topic also suggests that 14 percent of students are homeless

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