Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students. See all our Special Reports

Latino students at Loyola Marymount University in California have an enviable 80 percent graduation rate, compared with 77 percent for white students.

New research shows Latinos closing the racial gap on college degrees, but still lagging far behind whites

Big differences in graduation rates persist, depending on the institution

Anthony Rodriguez and Juneba Sulaiman both passed a college-level statistics class last summer after a placement exam indicated they weren’t ready for college-level math.

The community college “segregation machine”

Too many black and Latino students get stuck in remedial classes, thwarting college dreams

Along with demonstrators, supporters of President Donald J. Trump showed up for the opening day of the new civil rights museum; one supporter looks at a list of those who were lynched. 

Never mind Trump’s visit — Mississippi’s new Civil Rights Museum is a real game changer for education

State’s racist history revealed in unsparing detail: ‘It hurts my heart’

In an era of inequity, more and more college financial aid is going to the rich

Poor students still get money, but higher-income classmates get a growing share

Great Hall, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OPINION: Five reasons colleges can enroll more low-income students

New findings in a growing body of research

OPINION: Research confirms an urgent need to improve how students are supported when choosing college majors

First-gen and minority students suffer from a lack of professional advice

Modesto, California — Afternoon kindergarten teacher Margaret Peralez helps, from left, Cesar Mackan, Monserrat Mendoza and Cristian Bustamante with Spanish reading while morning class teacher Maria Mota leads intensive English vocabulary instruction in the background.

TEACHER VOICE: What we’re all ignoring about the stubborn achievement gap for Latino students

Classroom methods that won’t fail our English learners

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Betsy DeVos appears before the United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions for her a January confirmation hearing.

Gouged by for-profit schools, students could soon be out of luck

Education Secretary DeVos criticized over lack of protections, loan forgiveness

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