Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students. See all our Special Reports

Dominic, 3 and Zaire, 2, play while their moms take part in a conversation about bullying at a Family Scholar House Café Night.

These formerly homeless single moms beat the odds and are now college grads

They're hoping to give their children a better chance, too

Even if they want to go to college, millions of adults live in higher education “deserts”

At least 25 miles from the nearest campus, they also don’t have internet speeds to study online

Allison Dinsmore and her boyfriend, Grant Montgomery, students at California’s Newark Memorial High School. Montgomery says college recruiters seldom come to their school.

Silicon Valley aims its tech at helping low-income kids get beyond high school

New platform gives some students a message they rarely hear: They can go to college

The new convocation center at Xavier University is seen in New Orleans, Monday, Sept. 2, 2013. Student Landan Moore says Xavier is his dream school.

A college scholarship meant to help low-income, black students now serves mostly white, middle-class kids

Not TOPS anymore? Louisiana may cut scholarship program that used to be a national model

High schools push few students with disabilities to consider college

Most students with disabilities can make it to and through college, but are hindered by low expectations.

How much would it cost to get all students up to average?

Most low-income schools don't receive enough money to help kids hit average math and reading scores, a new study shows

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Online work has become a classroom staple for students around the country, but hundreds of thousands are still locked out because of inadequate internet connections.

Federal penny pinchers keeping rural schools from the internet

Federal E-rate money could bring these high-speed connections to rural schools, but funding is elusive

Student Amalia Lewis-Miller at the Cuyahoga Community College Eastern campus, where a special program helped her finish on time. The program is being eliminated.

Worried about enrollment and judged on success, some colleges boost support

But the high price of helping a new generation of students creates a “dynamic tension”

Is the trauma of training for a school shooter worth it?

Most American students practice "active shooter" drills in school. Less than one in a million of them will need it.

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