Divided We Learn

Once the way up the socioeconomic ladder in America, higher education may now be deepening the divisions. First-generation, low-income students disproportionately wind up at campuses with the fewest resources; their wealthier counterparts, at the best. And, contradicting public promises, universities are raising their net prices faster for low-income than higher-income students. See all our Special Reports

Behind the Latino college degree gap

Latinos are the least likely ethnic or racial group to get a college education, new report says

How one test kept New York City high schools segregated

Student Voice: “I’m a Hispanic woman from the Bronx, I’m trying to get into Stuy. It’s unrealistic”

Money makes the difference for kindergarteners in the summer

Rising income inequality is exacerbating gaps in how we invest in children

Lack of sufficient financial aid has forced Jocelyn Ramirez to work more than 40 hours a week and cut down on coursework so she can afford to stay in college.

Eligible for financial aid, nearly a million students never get it

States run out of money and aspiring low-income college students feel the pain

Giving parents more freedom to choose doesn’t guarantee better schools

Other countries offer clues about how effective nationwide school choice would be in the U.S.

A protest in support of DACA in downtown Kansas City, MO.

‘We’ve failed them’: How South Carolina education policy hurts ‘Dreamers’ — and costs taxpayers

The state is one of two states that ban the admission of undocumented students.

Support
Our
Mission

Hi. Thanks to your support, we provide the best education coverage in the country.

Donate

The unseen obstacles facing undocumented college students

What will happen to immigrant students post-DACA?

Elycea Almodovar, a junior at Salem State University, right, walks on campus with her roommate, Sabrina Ornae, a junior. Almodovar was drawn to the school because of its diversity.

More Hispanics are going to college. The bad news? They’re still behind

But the proportion of Hispanics earning degrees lags the proportion of whites

20 judgments a teacher makes in 1 minute and 28 seconds

A researcher says 'micro moments' in the classroom reveal implicit biases, subtle racism and sexism

Prev
1
of
20
Next