Photo of Lillian Mongeau

Engagement Editor

Lillian Mongeau

Lillian Mongeau is the Engagement Editor and West Coast Bureau Chief. Her future as a writer was not a forgone conclusion, according to her first grade teacher, Miss. Gill. "I would like to see her put more effort into her writing," Gill wrote on Lillian's first term report card. Also, "Practice math facts to 10... She should know them without using her fingers." While Lillian still often uses her fingers to add (Common Core says it's OK), she has gone on to win several awards for her writing. Most notably, she was a 2017 Livingston Award for Young Journalists finalist for her series on public preschool in the United States. Lillian was also awarded a special citation from the Education Writers Association for a feature in The Dallas Morning News on returning to South Texas, where she'd served as a Teach For America teacher, to see her former students graduate high school. Her work for The Hechinger Report has appeared in The Atlantic, The New York Times, and The Christian Science Monitor among other publications. Lillian is an alumna of the U.C. Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism and Barnard College at Columbia University. When she's not reading the news or a novel, she likes to ski, quilt and run.

Recent Stories

What happens when a regular high school decides no student is a lost cause?

Trauma-informed education is spreading from alternative high schools to comprehensive ones, and it’s not always an easy fit

African-American boys who tell better stories as preschoolers may learn to read more quickly

African-American children tend to have stronger oral narrative skills in preschool, a new study says. For boys, that may pay dividends later on

The future of proficiency-based education

Will a focus on mastering skills take off in Maine, or will schools change their terms without changing their teaching?

Why Maine’s new high school graduation rules could hurt more than help

Some schools find the requirements too complicated to put in place

How diplomas based on skill acquisition, not credits earned, could change education

By 2021, students graduating from Maine high schools must show they have mastered specific skills to earn a high school diploma. Maine is the first state to pass such a law, though the idea of valuing skills over credits is increasingly popular around the country.

How to hire more black principals

Nonprofit groups are using new strategies to diversify the talent pool for school leaders

Idaho gives education money directly to teenagers to manage themselves

Every seventh grader gets $4,125 to spend on early college credits, other extras

Why six states still spend nothing on preschool

Many state preschool programs are still tiny, but in the Mountain West and New Hampshire, they are nonexistent. Here’s why

California voters overturn English-only instruction law

Multilingual Education Act passes and revives bilingual education in one of nation's most diverse states

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