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What it actually takes for schools to ‘go digital’

By Margaret Ramirez

Statesville, N.C. – As a hazy morning sun rises over the rural farm community surrounding North Iredell Middle School, the students take their seats and lift their MacBooks to start the school day. Soon, the glow of hundreds of screens illuminates each face in every classroom. Inside Skye Templeton’s seventh-grade Social Studies class, students are […]

Photo: Peter Taylor

Has this new online college program solved the MOOC problem?

By Timothy Pratt

ATLANTA – Dary Merckens was in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, several weeks before moving to Las Vegas. He was also entering his second month in a master’s degree program at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Merckens, who is 30, can take his education with him. That’s because he’s enrolled in Georgia […]

Ronald Bracamontes, 8, Christian Zaragosa, 9, and Jocelyn Buenrostro, 9, teamed up to experiment with paper airplane designs during a summer school program at Romero-Cruz Elementary in Santa Ana Unified. The team conducted nine tests on three designs to see which one generated the smoothest landings.

Will ‘creative’ and ‘hands on’ summer school foster a love of learning?

By William Diepenbrock

SANTA ANA, Calif. – Nine-year-old Sarahy Lopez’s silvery singing voice washed over the audience as her Goldilocks declared “so sorry” and “please give me a break.” But her pleas were slow to sway Baby Bear (Noe Lopez, 7) who growled, “I’d rather stay angry and eat her instead.” A few streets over, Lupita Martinez, 6, […]

File photo. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Programs seek to lower cost of college textbooks

By Laura M. Colarusso

If you were to ask Sandra Kerley how important it is that she’s able to get textbooks for free, she would tell you that this seemingly minor benefit is “life changing.” “It helps us pay the electricity bill,”said the 35-year-old Kerley, a third-year business administration student at Tidewater Community College in Virginia. “It helps us […]

The banks of the Mississippi River, as seen from Great River Road State Park in the Mississippi Delta, where there is a dearth of structured activities for children in the summer. (Photo: Nick Chiles)

Are the lazy days of summer killing our nation’s academic progress?

By Nick Chiles

DREW, Miss. ––Drive down a dusty road in the Mississippi Delta in July and you will quickly come across a familiar scene: Kids, walking. Out of the house, no particular destination in mind. Ambling along. But the walking may be better than the alternative: Stopping. It’s the stopping that gets you in trouble. “In the […]

Students at Ivy Tech Community College. (Photo: Ivy Tech Community College)

How to educate Americans for jobs? Ask the Germans, employers urge

By Jon Marcus

INDIANAPOLIS — Two years. That’s how long it takes William Lankin’s fast-growing electrical contracting company to teach new hires with four-year university degrees the tricks of the trade. These college grads “have learned the book stuff, but they don’t have real-world experience,” said Lankin, vice president of Industrial Electric. “They don’t know how to work […]

A Everest College location in Woodbridge, Virginia on July 6, 2014. Corinthian Colleges, the parent company of Everest College and for-profit corporation has come under scrutiny by the Department of Education for alleged predatory recruiting that leaves students with high levels of debt and low graduation rates. Photo Credit: Kristoffer Tripplaar/ Sipa USA (Sipa via AP Images)

Experts counsel students to watch out for warning signs of troubled colleges

By Matt Krupnick

When Corinthian Colleges Inc. agreed in July to sell off or close nearly all of its 107 campuses, it left 72,000 students wondering about their futures—and whether they should have seen the writing on the wall. Now, with more colleges and universities than ever having trouble making ends meet, experts are urging students to pay […]

How one Ohio mother is trying to take down the Common Core

By Sarah Butrymowicz

CINCINNATI – The several hundred people that filled the sanctuary of Faith Christian Fellowship Church on the outskirts of Cincinnati on a Monday evening in July murmured their indignation as Heidi Huber blasted a book that taught that homosexuality was normal. The book wouldn’t be important except it had popped up on a Catholic school […]

A teacher-training workshop at Kennesaw State University in Georgia

Responding to student demand, universities teach teachers how to teach

By Timothy Pratt

KENNESAW, Ga. — Michele DiPietro had his listeners in stitches with his impressions of dumb things college students say in class. Then he sobered them up with advice about how they could do their own jobs better, and asked how they handled such recurring classroom challenges as apathy and short attention spans. DiPietro’s disciples were […]

Devon Sanford dropped out of school the summer before ninth grade to take care of his sick mother, making him one of the thousands of California middle school dropouts who go largely unnoticed.

Thousands of California kids don’t get past middle school

By Sarah Butrymowicz

LOS ANGELES – Devon Sanford’s mother was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer when he was in the eighth grade. After barely finishing at Los Angeles’s Henry Clay Middle School, he never enrolled in high school. Instead, he spent what should have been his freshman year caring for his mother and waiting for the police to show […]

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