poverty

Oliver Francis, of Philadelphia, was placed in foster care because he was truant. He graduated from George Junior Republic, a residential school in Grove City, Pennsylvania, this spring.

New report underscores education problems in institutions for foster youth

Advocacy groups call for Pennsylvania state government to step up oversight of residential facilities

Charter school leaders should talk more about racism

Praising charters for “doing more with less” ignores how racist systems have devalued black communities, starving kids in both traditional and charter schools of resources

Matthew Snyder applied for the job of superintendent in Cheraw, Colorado. The school board liked him (and the idea of saving money) so much that it asked if he’d serve as principal too.

The big jobs of small-town principals

Rural school leaders have some of the most complex roles in education — and some of the highest attrition

In San Antonio, school integration may not lift all boats

One of the most economically segregated cities in the countries is trying integration to compete with charters and other school districts, but some schools in the poorest areas aren’t benefitting

Western Michigan sophomore Kayla Mayes has been in foster care for as long as she can remember. The Seita Scholars Program gives her academic, financial and emotional support.

From foster care to college

Western Michigan University is one of several colleges that have started programs to help foster youth earn degrees

New York City Schools Chancellor Harold Levy talks on the phone in his office in downtown Brooklyn, N.Y., Thursday, May 11, 2000. Levy, head of the country's largest school system, is pushing music and poetry in a system plagued with rats, guns and crumbling school buildings.

Remembering former NYC Schools Chancellor Harold Levy: A champion for children and a real mensch

Levy did many things in life, but most loved being chancellor

Sasha Redlener, a fourth-grade teacher at Mott Haven Academy Charter School, helps her students with an assignment. Classes at the school mix “body breaks” and other playtime with reading and math instruction and lessons in social and emotional skills.

‘A child is not a revolving door’

A South Bronx school started by a child welfare agency has gradually found answers for educating youth in foster care

Support
Our
Mission

Hi. Thanks to your support, we provide the best education coverage in the country.

Donate
Sam Larson, 15, measures a section of his cardboard canoe during ANSEP’s summer Acceleration Academy at the University of Alaska in July 2018.

Alaska Native students pursue STEM, with great success

Pushing back against stereotypes, students in the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program outperform students of all backgrounds in math and science

School founder Howard Fuller visits with students at the Milwaukee Collegiate Academy charter school.

Segregated schools are still the norm. Howard Fuller is fine with that

A longtime advocate for black-controlled schools in Milwaukee found an unlikely home among conservatives pushing school choice

Clarissa Santana is a mother of three who is frustrated when she returns to college at the University of Akron and learns her credits from a for-profit school don’t transfer. She tells her story in the new documentary “Unlikely.”

Two new documentaries showcase a long and winding road to college

‘Personal Statement,’ and ‘Unlikely’ hit the film festival circuits with stories of real-life obstacles and struggles

Prev
1
of
13
Next